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Questions tagged [noble-gases]

Questions about elements of group 18 (group 0 in old notation) of the periodic table and their compounds, created despite the low reactivity of these elements.

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Is there such thing as metallic helium?

I know that hydrogen can behave as a conductor under high pressure (metallic hydrogen); however could helium behave similarly under high pressure? If so, could this have any potential benefits over ...
Nitrogen-8's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
221 views

Is oganesson really a noble gas?

Oganesson $\ce{_{118}Og}$ is believed to have a full valence shell and is listed in group 18. Nevertheless, it is very unstable and is believed to occur as a solid under standard conditions due to ...
Nitrogen-8's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
73 views

Can heat cause the excitation of argon

Can argon be excited by heating? I work with a process that involves heating titanium to 500c-1000c in an argon environment. On our camera, the material looks purple when heated, the same shade as ...
Andriy's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
141 views

Are there xenon compounds with two xenon atoms bonded directly to each other? [duplicate]

I've seen so many compounds containing xenon, and xenon was mostly the central atom, and if we had 2 xenons they would never bond directly to each other. I was curious if it is possible to have for ...
user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
75 views

If we say that neon , krypton, aryon and oganesson are stable beacuse they follow octate rule, then why are xenon and radon are stable? [closed]

Neon is $\ce{K^2 L^8}$, Argon is $\ce{K^2 L^8 M^8}$, Krypton is $\ce{K^2 L^8 M^{18} N^8}$, But Xenon is $\ce{K^2 L^8 M^{18} N^{26}}$ and radon $\ce{K^2 L^8 M^18 N^{32} O^{26}}$ They don't follow ...
Veeraraghavan's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
123 views

How is it possible for the moon to contain any helium-3?

According to the following article, scientists have known the lunar surface contains deposits of helium-3 since the Apollo program. The Chinese Chang'e 5 mission appears to confirm it after returning ...
user148298's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

Why does XeO3 not hybridize d orbitals? [duplicate]

Apologies if this is a dumb question. In my chemistry class we are discussing hybridization, and an example that came up for $sp_3$ hybridization was the compound $\ce{XeO3}$. However, this seems ...
Max0815's user avatar
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10 votes
0 answers
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Why are vapours of xenon hexafluoride coloured?

According to Wikipedia, [...] It is a colorless solid that readily sublimes into intensely yellow vapors. It is clear from the above statement that $\ce{XeF6}$ is colourless in solid form. But why ...
Infinite's user avatar
  • 1,644
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

How does xenon react with O₂F₂?

This reaction was asked in my college entrance exam. I searched through the entire Internet, but I couldn't find any papers/sources. I suspect since O₂F₂ is a strong fluorinating agent, one of the ...
Ayush Kumar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

On the idea of heavy atmospheric Xenon

I am wondering about the plausibility of an idea for a Si-fi planet, mostly seeing if it would be like I imagine, and what else would be needed for what I want. I am thinking of a planet with large ...
Zoey's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can nitric oxide (NO) reduce xenon fluorides

I came across the following question: $\ce{XeF4}$ on reaction with gaseous nitric oxide forms xenon gas and (P). Find the total number of lone pairs present in one molecule of P. As far as xenon ...
Ammaarah Fatima's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
223 views

Noble gas configuration and valence shell electrons [duplicate]

I know that the maximum number of electrons within a shell is equal to 2n^2. I would think that the noble gases would reflect this but that isn’t always the case n = 1 2(1^2) = 2, this is the atomic ...
Ibby's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
224 views

Do helium and neon form "stable" chemical compounds?

Helium and neon are the two most unreactive elements in the Periodic Table, but could they form compounds with an element such as fluorine that won't spontaneously explode and decompose outside of ...
Bruh Moments's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
745 views

Why is strontium(II) ion bigger than krypton atom?

$\ce{Sr^2+}$ is exactly the same as $\ce{Kr}$, in terms of electrons and orbitals. The only difference between the two, is that $\ce{Sr^2+}$ has a couple of extra protons in the nucleus (and probably ...
peppa's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
216 views

Magnitude of Lennard-Jones force evaluated with molecular dynamics simulation

The intent is to evaluate the error source of a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation which is only based on the Lennard-Jones interaction between noble gases (helium in this case). What is the magnitude ...
Mika R.'s user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
100 views

Does helium freeze at absolute zero? [duplicate]

Does helium freeze at absolute zero? In theory, it should, since all random motions of particles stops at absolute zero, right?
The_CIA's user avatar
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1 answer
950 views

Can someone help me figure out what the noble gas configurations for zirconium and holmium are? [closed]

I am currently working on noble gas configurations in chemistry and I am having a hard time understanding why I got two questions wrong on a practice. The instructions for the practice are here: Write ...
Audrey W.'s user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
303 views

How to make krypton gas glow

So hypothetically, if one was to buy krypton and wanted to make it glow, would a little tesla coil be enough to make it glow? If not, what would be enough? And would one be able to make it glow ...
Seth. M's user avatar
  • 29
6 votes
1 answer
994 views

How can nitrogen be both inert and bond with everything in periodic table?

Aren't below statements from this link contradicting each other? Nitrogen bonds to almost all the elements in the periodic table except the first three noble gases, helium, neon, and argon ...
across's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Acidity order of xenon fluorides,oxides and oxofluorides [closed]

The acidity order of xenon oxides,fluorides and oxofluorides is: $\ce{XeF6 > XeO2F4 > XeO3F2 > XeO4 > XeOF4 > XeF4 > XeO2F2 > XeF3 > XeO3}$. How to justify this order? My ...
user600016's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
575 views

Are clathrates and interstitial compounds the same thing?

In the book$\ce{^{[1]}}$, it's given that clathrates are compounds in which gases are entrapped within cavities of crystal lattices of certain organic or inorganic compounds. Interstitial compounds ...
Aravindh Kumar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
274 views

How to store small amounts of gas

I need to store small amounts of gas. I already saw devices that look similar to the image below, but I don't know how they are called. Does someone here know how these devices are called? I am also ...
Efrischungsgetränk's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
228 views

Light up Noble gases [closed]

I saw you can light up the Noble gases with a Tesla coil. Does it also work with a plasma globe? Are there any other simple ways to make the gases glaw like that? And does it work with all the Noble ...
Avi Cohen's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
1 answer
105 views

Do Neon Lights Work Do To Stokes Shift?

I was wondering whether or not the reason some noble gases, like neon, fluoresce at particular frequencies of the visible spectrum is because of a Stokes effect? I mean, do the neon dimers get ...
James Remington Orozco Newton's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
5k views

How can every atom have unique spectral lines?

Why does every element have unique spectral lines? I have studied that spectral lines help us to identify the properties of an element. This is because after excitation when the excited electron(s) ...
आर्यभट्ट's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
657 views

Anomaly in van der Waals constants of noble gases

In van der Waals equation for a real gas, the equation is $$\left(P + a\frac{n^2}{V^2}\right)(V - nb) = nRT$$ where $P$ is the pressure of the real gas, $n$ is the number of moles of the gas, $R$ is ...
Cyclopropane's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
194 views

Why does the earth have more radon in some locations?

I am not a chemist so I'm not going to give specific amounts of radon; different countries use different units. My question: why do some areas have more radon? For instance, Australia has a ...
Snack_Food_Termite's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
2k views

Electric glow discharge of last 2 noble gases

Radon is an extremely unstable noble gas. Due to this, putting it in a gas discharge lamp for a prolonged period of time is extremely hard, as pure radon is needed to give a true color, but radon ...
Max0815's user avatar
  • 323
2 votes
1 answer
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Argon vs nitrogen for preserving wine

I have a question regarding whether argon or nitrogen is to prefer when it comes to preserving wine. Specifically, I am interested in knowing if there is a difference in preservation periods. Also, ...
Martin Beyer's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
916 views

What is the explanation of the structure of H2XeO4?

Using the obsolete VSEPR theory I had a hard time predicting the structure of $\ce{H2XeO4}$. So I looked it up. I found the molecule via chemapps.stolaf.edu: It looks weird to me. I can't explain the ...
Damn it My Foot's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
328 views

Are there known compounds of caesium with oxidation number >1?

Given that the left neighbor of caesium, xenon, does have fluorides and oxides, it is not inconceivable that caesium can have oxides or fluorides with an oxidation number higher than 1. Are such ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
317 views

Influence of the neighbouring molecules in a crystal at the example of XeF4

For reasons of symmetry I (without deeper chemical knowledge) supposed, that $\ce{XeF4}$ has a shape like $\ce{CH4}$. But according to Wikipedia its crystalline structure was determined by both NMR ...
HolgerFiedler's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why is helium considered as a non-metal?

How can helium be considered as a non-metal based on its chemical properties? Helium is a noble gas; it does not take part in chemical reactions under ordinary conditions. But non-metals tend to gain ...
Khushi Karanpuria's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Do xenon di- and tetrafluorides react with glass?

A question came in my test asking which of the compounds are not stored in glass. The answers were $\ce{HF},$ $\ce{XeF6},$ $\ce{XeF4},$ $\ce{XeF2}$. I know about $\ce{HF}$ and $\ce{XeF6},$ but not ...
Shubhraneel Pal's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
168 views

Does the hydrohelium dication exist?

It is well-known that there exists the $\ce{He2^2+}$ dication, and also $\ce{HHe+}$ and $\ce{H2+}$ cations. But I could not find any definite information about the existence or inexistence of the $\ce{...
Alexander Olikevich's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
407 views

Acids of noble gases

Are there any other acids of noble gasses besides xenic acid? Why other ones seem to be very unstable (like perxenic), or completely unknown (acids of any other noble gases). Particularly are there ...
Harsh jain's user avatar
  • 1,693
5 votes
4 answers
1k views

Forging steel inside a zero oxygen environment

Intro: I have watched one too many blacksmithing videos and now I have a question: is it possible to forge steel (either just reshape or "forge-weld") inside a no-oxygen environment? Scenario: ...
DGMS89's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
1k views

For a given period, why is the boiling point of the halogen greater than that of the noble gas?

The boiling point of bromine, a halogen, is $\pu{58.8^\circ C}$, while the boiling point of krypton, the noble gas in the same period as bromine, is $\pu{-153.4 ^\circ C}$. I thought that the larger ...
Mathy1002's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
6k views

Why is zinc not considered to have a noble gas configuration?

I am wondering why we say that, for example, zinc does not have a noble gas configuration? I would like to say beforehand that this question may has its origin in a confusion about the word "shell" ...
thyme's user avatar
  • 319
-1 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why is the oxidation state of Carbon (-4)?

Based on my understanding, atoms try to achieve the electronic configuration of the nearest noble gas, by losing or gaining electrons. For example, Sodium is closest to Neon, so loses an electron so ...
user avatar
19 votes
3 answers
3k views

What happens to the argon in the Haber-Bosch process?

The Haber–Bosch process is used to synthesis ammonia from atmospheric nitrogen and hydrogen derived from a hydrocarbon such as methane. The process requires high temperatures and pressures and also ...
Slarty's user avatar
  • 423
3 votes
1 answer
8k views

Why is xenon hexafluoride not stored in glass?

Why is $\ce{XeF_6}$ not stored in glass containers? Isn't the reason glass is used for most acids is that it is non-reactive?
prog_SAHIL's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
2k views

Ar atomic radius Vs. Mg2+, Al3+ and F-

I find it difficult to understand why the Atomic radius of $\ce{Ar}$ is lower than the ionic radius of $\ce{Mg^2+}$ and $\ce{F-}$, and higher than $\ce{Al^3+}$. According to the tables I've seen: $$\...
Itay Day's user avatar
33 votes
1 answer
6k views

What is the molecular structure of xenon hexafluoride?

Xenon hexafluoride, $\ce{XeF6}$, can be obtained by reaction of xenon with excess fluorine gas. What is the gas-phase structure of the molecule? What experimental evidence is there to support it, ...
orthocresol's user avatar
  • 71.4k
5 votes
1 answer
85 views

What makes for a good 'swimmer' in order see the filling level of Xenon gas in a vessel?

Most foams will probably get heavier due to diffusion. Is there glass balls this thin?
HannesH's user avatar
  • 483
4 votes
1 answer
134 views

What is the effect of Helium-based surroundings (99% Helium) on electrochemical gas sensors?

I am currently working on a project measuring gas composition of car exhaust. In order to dilute the gas concentration down to something electrochemical sensors can read, I diluted the sample with ...
wizzzz1's user avatar
  • 41
1 vote
1 answer
150 views

How do molecules know how to behave when a disturbance occurs in an equilibrium?

I am well aware of Le Chatelier's principle, but what causes molecules to behave in such a way, my guess is that it all has to do with rates of reactions and frequency of collisions. When at a ...
LM26's user avatar
  • 396
-2 votes
1 answer
1k views

How come noble gases have full outer shells? [closed]

Argon has $18$ electrons overall and $8$ in the outer shell. But the $3^{rd}$ shell is supposed to have $18$ electrons. Please use A-level terms so that I can understand.
gifty's user avatar
  • 7
9 votes
2 answers
4k views

Bonding of Lithium and Argon

I saw a meme that was joking around about Lithium and Argon bonding (see pic below). It got me wondering: Can Lithium and Argon bond in any circumstance?
Christian Sirolli's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is the structure of the hypothetical xenon octafluoride?

According to Frlec et al.,[1] theoretical studies indicated that there is a possibility (albeit slim) that neutral xenon octafluoride ($\ce{XeF8}$) might exist. I am curious as to what structure this ...
Swastik's user avatar
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