Questions tagged [electrons]

Electrons are subatomic particles with the symbol e−. They have a negative electric charge (-1 elementary charge. )

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Acids give H+ in a reaction thus called reducing agent. But according to Lewis theory of acid and base, anything accepting pair of electron is acid [closed]

Now as acids accept electrons and so must be called oxidizing agent. and I feel it to be a bit contradicting. please clarify if any misconception
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What does the horizontal axis on cyclic voltammograms mean?

In cyclic voltammograms (like the one in the attached image) what exactly is the horizontal axis' voltage refering to? Is it the measured voltage between the reference electrode and working electrode? ...
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Lone pairs of electrons and covalent bonding [closed]

Every time I saw a covalent bond structure, I notice that there are always lone pairs or no electrons left in the outer shell of the atoms. Is it compulsory for covalent bonds to have lone pairs or no ...
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Excitation of electron in Niels Bohr's atomic model

Professor taught us that an electron gains or looses only those energies which are equal to difference in two energy levels. That is $E_1 + \Delta E = E_2$ or $E_1 + \Delta E = E_3.$ What if we give, ...
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Why can't the energy of an electron exceed 0 eV?

Today we were learning about atomic structure, our teacher introduced the mathematics of the 'Niels Bohr Model of Atom', and calculated the value of total energy $\frac{-13.6z^2}{n^2} \pu{eV}$. He ...
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Why does STED microscopy cause photodamage?

STED (stimulated emission depletion) microscopy is a technique which enables sub-diffraction limit of light imaging. The depletion laser is at 775nm, and about 500 mW, concentrated for a short ...
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Explanation of rusting of iron through metallic bonding

1 ) [O - oxygen atoms , red dots - electron ] Explaining rusting of iron due to metallic bonding. So , here delocalisation of electron happens between Fe and Fe atoms. After some time , there is ...
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Do Hartree-Fock (or other model Hamiltonian) electron densities fullfill the Kato theorem?

I have done Hartree-Fock calculations on a single He atom and now I tried to check numerically if the electron density fulfills the Kato theorem. It apparently doesn't. Instead I obtain a cusp ...
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Does a change in oxidation number in a redox reaction mean that an actual electron transfer occured?

Oxidation numbers are fictitious charges that pretend the entire molecule is an ion i.e. it artificially localizes electrons onto atoms within a single molecule. In a redox reaction, we find that an ...
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What does “spin degeneracy” mean in this context?

I am currently studying Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, second edition, by Coldren, Corzine, and Mashanovitch. In chapter 1.2 ENERGY LEVELS AND BANDS IN SOLIDS, the authors say the ...
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Maximum number of Spectral Lines “A better quantum model shows that there will be n^2 transitions”?

I was parsing the following post What is the maximum number of emission lines when the excited electron of a H atom in n = 6 drops to ground state? and came across with the reply from @porphyrin. cite ...
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If electrons absorb photons to reach higher energy levels in Bohr's atom, why do they have lesser kinetic energy?

In Bohr's atomic model, an electron can jump to a higher energy level by absorbing a photon with energy equal to the difference in energy between 2 energy levels. This should mean that the electron ...
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Confusions regarding oscillator in black body and value of one quantum [closed]

Q 1 By saying oscillator I.e atoms in the wall of black body. Do we mean electron ? Because boundary of any atom is electron right. Q2 My textbook say that quantum is the smallest value of energy that ...
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Does electron emit photon when it moves? [closed]

When the photoelectric effect happens or blackbody radiation happens or when an electron jumps from a ground to an excited state, we say light is emitted by electron. Now, light is made up of photons. ...
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Confusion regarding orbital, electron and Quantum no’s

Now , In some textbook I have read that orbital is nothing but the shape of electron . s,p,d orbitals etc. So , after knowing shape of an orbital . I got to know that inside the orbital is an electron ...
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What if kinetic energy of ejected electron = 0

When hf ≥ work function, Then the electron still comes out. So, if I say kinetic energy of ejected electron = 0, it should still come out. Then, how does the electron even move out or gets ejected if ...
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Number of π electrons in all trans-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid

Sketch the Lewis structure of all trans-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid. (a) Consider the delocalized π electrons. Employ the particle-in-a-box model. Drawing on your knowledge about the occupation of ...
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Organic Based Photocathode

What organic molecules have a relatively small work function, preferably in the visible spectrum? Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are in the low UV spectrum, making it unsuitable for the photocathode ...
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Why is it that protons and electrons undergo the same amount of deflection in an electric field if they have the same energy?

The question I have is with respect to this diagram. Which depicts a stream of protons and electrons entering a proton field with equal energy. Why is it that in the case where the energy of protons ...
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Relationship between Quantum Numbers and the Wave-function

I recently started learning about quantum mechanics and its applciations in atomic structure in chemistry. In this inorganic textbook Inorganic Chemistry, it describes "Each of the wavefunctions ...
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Why does allyl anion have only two resonance structures?

There are only two resonance structures of allyl anion with negative charge distributed over positions 1 and 3: $$\ce{\overset{-}{C}H2-CH=CH2 <-> CH_2=CH-\overset{-}{C}H2}.$$ What's the criteria ...
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Schrodinger's Equation and Wave Function

So I understand that there exists the shrodinger's equation, which on solving,gives the wave function of an electron. The wave function as I understand, gives all possible information about an ...
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3answers
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How can chlorine be 'only' the third-most electronegative element yet have the highest electron affinity?

From Wikipedia: It is an extremely reactive element and a strong oxidising agent: among the elements, it has the highest electron affinity and the third-highest electronegativity on the Pauling scale, ...
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Stability of an atom in absence of EM field

According to Bohr model of atom, electrons move up an energy level in presence of EM field and emit a photon moving down the level. In complete absence of any external EM field, shouldn't the electron ...
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Is this bond Ionic or Covalent, and why? AlBr [closed]

We know a compound could form between NaCl because they are +1 and -1 ions which make them both into a complete valence set. Could a compound form between Al and Br, for example, and what type of bond ...
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Where to find DFT Datasets with 3D Electron Density values?

This may be dumb question. Please bear with me. Where can I find datasets with 3D electron density values and any related physical property. I have looked up the QM9 dataset as well, but since I am ...
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Why do electrons jump back after absorbing energy and moving to a higher energy level?

Electrons in a shell absorb energy and move to higher energy levels, but they release their energy and jump back to the shell they originally were in. Why do they jump back? Why can they not keep ...
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Did JJ Thomson know about Eugen Goldstein’s experiment discovering canal rays?

We learn that JJ Thomson discovered the electron in 1897. Several years EARLIER in 1886, Eugen Goldstein performs the same experiment but with the anode and cathode switched to produce positively ...
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What does orbital mean, exactly? [duplicate]

My teacher told me that orbital is the probability distribution data of the electron around nucleus which is amplitude data in a way. An example of how my teacher actually told what it means involves ...
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Does electron mass decrease when it changes its orbit?

I have studied this in my chapter atomic structure that when an electron changes its orbit from lower energy to higher energy state , it does not state in my book that it moves there but that it ...
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What happens if we continuously hit an atom with photons

My sir told me that Energy required to remove an electron from one orbit to another depends on hf * n. Where n means the no of photons that will strike on a metal surface and hf is energy of one ...
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What does Pauli’s exclusion principle mean in atomic or fundamental way? [closed]

It means is that no electron can have same n , l and $m_l$ but can have two different spin quantum number. I want to know why is this rule valid?Means there must be some other things happening also ...
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Finding excited stage of electron from its potential energy

The potential energy of an electron in the hydrogen atom is $\pu{-6.8 eV}.$ Indicate the excited stage in which electron is present. Total energy would be equal to $\pu{-3.4 eV}.$ I used the formula $...
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What are high-energy electrons?

I read that (in cellular respiration) the transported electrons in NADH have a higher energy than those in FADH2. I can't find a (simple or otherwise) explanation of what a "high-energy" ...
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Excitation states of neon (or other gas) inside neon lights

I'm interested in the spectra of gas discharge tubes. Taking neon as an example, when I look up on NIST the spectra for neon, I find excitation states up to Ne IX. Where do I find/how do I work out ...
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Why does the Most Stable State of an Atom Tend to be One with Full s and p Subshells?

I'm new to posting on stack exchange, although I've read a lot of it before. This question seems like it might end up being marked as a duplicate, but I've looked through a lot of the similar ...
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What did I do wrong in my orbital notation for this Os (Osmium) question?

I was given a question where I had to write the orbital notation of Osmium (Os) and I got it wrong. The question: 6s2 --> ↑↓ 4f --> ↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓ 5d6 --> ↑↓↑↓↑↑ The arrows above are my ...
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Can someone help me figure out what the noble gas configurations for zirconium and holmium are? [closed]

I am currently working on noble gas configurations in chemistry and I am having a hard time understanding why I got two questions wrong on a practice. The instructions for the practice are here: Write ...
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How does a body lose electrons? [closed]

If there is a Na and cl in solid form , There will be atoms inside of them.How do they lose electrons ?.We know solid body has a structure and covering.Just like you can touch is the covering of table ...
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Electroplating: What exactly does an additive/ brightener do in the electrolyte?

A carrier or supressor is generally a poly-oxyalkyl compound that is instrumental in suppressing the electrolytic current. This is achieved by the formation of a diffusion layer when the additives ...
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In Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, do higher atomic elements ever generate just K lines without L or M lines?

The heavier elements only show L or M lines. Is that because the critical ionisation energy is too high to get K lines in higher atomic numbers? Can you ever get just the K lines, or just the M lines ...
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Number of orbitals Lithium

I have a very rudimentary question on orbitals (I have basic chemistry knowledge, using for a comp chem project) Lithium, to my understanding, has three electrons allocated to the 1s and 2s orbitals. ...
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Counting electrons in Ozonolysis [closed]

I can't understand the electron count made on this page about Ozonolysis. (http://ursula.chem.yale.edu/~chem220/chem220js/STUDYAIDS/ozonolysis/Oz.html) This is the specific part of the article: From ...
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Do higher orbitals have more energy or less energy? [duplicate]

I've recently learned that as an orbital gets larger, its energy gets closer to 0. Before this, I learned that when an electron moves down an orbital it releases the energy difference between those ...
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electron - nuclei recombination within stars

Nuclear fusion within stars combine atom nuclei, so the atoms are ionized and electrons run for free. My question is, when or how these electrons recombine with the nuclei to form neutral atoms? ...
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Maximum Local Value for the Electron Density

So the electron density is the function $\rho(\vec x)$ that associates a value of electrons per cubic angstrom, to each point $\vec x$ in the 3D space. This information tells us how likely it is to ...
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How can an electron being a wave have such property as spin?

Here's what I know about electrons. Electrons have wave-like properties and the number of wavelengths in the $n^\text{th}$ shell is equal to $n(\lambda).$ Also, I read in my book that they have ...
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Regarding comparison of ionization energies [closed]

Why is the ionization energy of $\ce{Mg^2+}$ greater than the ionization energy of $\ce{Ne}$ (neon)? My teacher said the answer was $\ce{Mg^2+}$ but I have no idea why as my general knowledge tells ...
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But what are anti-bonding pi-orbital? In search for an intuitive explanation [closed]

Imagine that you want to explain to an undergraduate why they have to to shade the pi-orbitals in a symmetrical way, i.e. dark on top (+), white on bottom (-) for two neighbouring pi-orbitals because ...
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Ionic radius for tetrahedral metal–ligand complexes

The ionic radii for metal–ligand complexes that are in an octahedral coordination are easy to find. I understand that when the $\mathrm{e_g}$ orbital is filled, the ionic radius increases because the ...

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