Questions tagged [electrons]

Electrons are subatomic particles with the symbol e−. They have a negative electric charge (-1 elementary charge. )

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2answers
399 views

What are high-energy electrons?

I read that (in cellular respiration) the transported electrons in NADH have a higher energy than those in FADH2. I can't find a (simple or otherwise) explanation of what a "high-energy" ...
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Excitation states of neon (or other gas) inside neon lights

I'm interested in the spectra of gas discharge tubes. Taking neon as an example, when I look up on NIST the spectra for neon, I find excitation states up to Ne IX. Where do I find/how do I work out ...
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Why does the Most Stable State of an Atom Tend to be One with Full s and p Subshells?

I'm new to posting on stack exchange, although I've read a lot of it before. This question seems like it might end up being marked as a duplicate, but I've looked through a lot of the similar ...
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1answer
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What did I do wrong in my orbital notation for this Os (Osmium) question?

I was given a question where I had to write the orbital notation of Osmium (Os) and I got it wrong. The question: 6s2 --> ↑↓ 4f --> ↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓↑↓ 5d6 --> ↑↓↑↓↑↑ The arrows above are my ...
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1answer
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Can someone help me figure out what the noble gas configurations for zirconium and holmium are? [closed]

I am currently working on noble gas configurations in chemistry and I am having a hard time understanding why I got two questions wrong on a practice. The instructions for the practice are here: Write ...
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1answer
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How does a body lose electrons? [closed]

If there is a Na and cl in solid form , There will be atoms inside of them.How do they lose electrons ?.We know solid body has a structure and covering.Just like you can touch is the covering of table ...
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Electroplating: What exactly does an additive/ brightener do in the electrolyte?

A carrier or supressor is generally a poly-oxyalkyl compound that is instrumental in suppressing the electrolytic current. This is achieved by the formation of a diffusion layer when the additives ...
2
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1answer
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In Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, do higher atomic elements ever generate just K lines without L or M lines?

The heavier elements only show L or M lines. Is that because the critical ionisation energy is too high to get K lines in higher atomic numbers? Can you ever get just the K lines, or just the M lines ...
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1answer
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Number of orbitals Lithium

I have a very rudimentary question on orbitals (I have basic chemistry knowledge, using for a comp chem project) Lithium, to my understanding, has three electrons allocated to the 1s and 2s orbitals. ...
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1answer
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Counting electrons in Ozonolysis [closed]

I can't understand the electron count made on this page about Ozonolysis. (http://ursula.chem.yale.edu/~chem220/chem220js/STUDYAIDS/ozonolysis/Oz.html) This is the specific part of the article: From ...
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1answer
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Do higher orbitals have more energy or less energy? [duplicate]

I've recently learned that as an orbital gets larger, its energy gets closer to 0. Before this, I learned that when an electron moves down an orbital it releases the energy difference between those ...
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1answer
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electron - nuclei recombination within stars

Nuclear fusion within stars combine atom nuclei, so the atoms are ionized and electrons run for free. My question is, when or how these electrons recombine with the nuclei to form neutral atoms? ...
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Maximum Local Value for the Electron Density

So the electron density is the function $\rho(\vec x)$ that associates a value of electrons per angstrom, to each point $\vec x$ in the 3D space. This information tells us how likely it is to find ...
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1answer
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How can an electron being a wave have such property as spin?

Here's what I know about electrons. Electrons have wave-like properties and the number of wavelengths in the $n^\text{th}$ shell is equal to $n(\lambda).$ Also, I read in my book that they have ...
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1answer
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Regarding comparison of ionization energies [closed]

Why is the ionization energy of $\ce{Mg^2+}$ greater than the ionization energy of $\ce{Ne}$ (neon)? My teacher said the answer was $\ce{Mg^2+}$ but I have no idea why as my general knowledge tells ...
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1answer
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But what are anti-bonding pi-orbital? In search for an intuitive explanation [closed]

Imagine that you want to explain to an undergraduate why they have to to shade the pi-orbitals in a symmetrical way, i.e. dark on top (+), white on bottom (-) for two neighbouring pi-orbitals because ...
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0answers
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Ionic radius for tetrahedral metal–ligand complexes

The ionic radii for metal–ligand complexes that are in an octahedral coordination are easy to find. I understand that when the $\mathrm{e_g}$ orbital is filled, the ionic radius increases because the ...
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1answer
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Where do the three negative oxygens in a phosphate group get their missing electron from?

A video I watched showed the construction of a phosphate group using a Lewis structure. The oxygen with the double bond fills its octet group. The three other oxygens lack an electron. The teacher ...
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1answer
60 views

Electron configuration of iron(I) cation

What is the electron configuration of $\ce{Fe+}$ cation? \begin{align} \ce{Fe+} &\!:~ [\ce{Ar}]\mathrm{(3d)^6(4s)^1}\label{chm:1}\tag{1}\\ \ce{Fe+} &\!:~ [\ce{Ar}]\mathrm{(3d)^7(4s)^0}\label{...
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What does an electron's spin of 0.5 and minus 0.5 signify?

While teaching me magnetism, my teacher told me about the spin of an electron. He told me that the spin of .5 means that if we rotate the electron twice counter-clockwise on its axis, we would have ...
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1answer
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Why does covalent bonding not break down if observer effect can be applied to atomic electrons? [closed]

The observer effect in quantum mechanics states that when unobserved, quantum particles such as electrons can simultaneously occupy two different states. In an atom of any element, where there are ...
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Could observer effect cause electrons in one orbital to be found in another?

The observer effect states that when unobserved, absolutely small particles like electrons can simultaneously be in two different states at the same time. (Tro, N. J. (2015). Principles of Chemistry: ...
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1answer
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What exactly are electron states?

From Tro's Chemistry: Structure and Properties [1, p. 93]: 2.5 Quantum Mechanics and the Atom As we have seen, the position and velocity of the electron are complementary properties—if we know one ...
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2answers
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How does a battery create a potential differece (voltage)? [closed]

I'm 15 and recently started electronics and I just had a question about batteries. (I've been told by people on physics stack exchange to come here to have my question answered). From what I ...
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1answer
71 views

Distribution of negative charges in iodine dioxide difluoride anion [closed]

I was drawing the structure for $\ce{[IO2F2]-}.$ I'm stuck on whether the negative charge should be given to oxygen or iodine.
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1answer
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How to determine the number of electron in a shell [duplicate]

My textbook has been mentioned that the maximum number of electron in a shell is 2n² and the octet rule. It has also said that period number signifies the number of electron shells of an element and ...
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1answer
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Grasping the concept of Electronic Spin, Effective Spin and Fictitious Spin

Trying to learn alone some aspects of quantum mechanics is, sometimes, a struggle. Reading the excellent paper by Piwowarska [1] I was hoping to, finally, understand what is the origin of the so-...
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1answer
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Difference between spin-orbit coupling and the Russell-Saunders Effect?

The Russell-Saunders effect is the same thing as 'spin-orbit interaction, correct? The reason I am asking is because I was reviewing the Wikipedia page on 'spin-orbit interaction' and it does not ...
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2answers
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Why do subshells and orbitals exist? [closed]

I'm just a curious high school student. Sorry if this sounds dumb. How exactly did the concept of atomic subshells and orbitals come about? And why exactly are there n-1 subshells and 2l+1 orbitals? ...
3
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1answer
86 views

While calculating the effective nuclear charge, why don't we consider effect of outer electrons on inner ones? [duplicate]

When calculating the effective nuclear charge for an electron, why do we only consider the repulsive effect of the inner electrons on the outer electrons? The outer electrons also repel the inner ones ...
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1answer
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What is the unit of Z effective?

Z effective is the net positive charge experienced by an electron. But what is the unit of this net charge: coulomb (C) or microcoulomb (μC), or something else?
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1answer
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Is there an opposite to shielding effect? [closed]

I recently read about shielding effect and lowering of effective nuclear charge due to penetration of other electrons. I wonder while doing calculations involving Slater's rules the electrons from ...
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Electron tunneling between orbitals

Electrons can move through potential barriers by tunneling. Atomic/molecular orbitals are separated by energy differences. Therefore I was wondering if an electron can tunnel from one orbital to ...
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1answer
74 views

Can a charge smaller than that of an electron exist? If so how? [closed]

In school I've always been taught that the smallest charge possible is that of an electron( or proton) however I recently solved a question regarding a dipole and the charge came smaller than that of ...
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1answer
72 views

How does the charge imbalance affect the cell reaction when there is no salt bridge in a galvanic cell?

As mentioned in the answers to this question Why is it important to use a salt bridge in a voltaic cell? Can a wire be used? a salt bridge is used to keep the two half cells neutral. i understand how ...
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1answer
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Why do we see complementary colors in UV/Vis Spectroscopy? [closed]

From what I read, a compound that absorbs visible light will produce a complementary color (using the color wheel), that can be seen. Why is this the case? Is it because, for example, if a molecule ...
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Is the C-I bond polar?

Carbon and iodine have similar electronegativities. The reason quoted for the C-I bond having polarity is that iodine is more polarisable. But what does this actually mean? Carbon distorts the ...
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1answer
59 views

Alkali metals chemistry [closed]

Ok my understanding of the electronic structure of atoms could be wrong but this is why I don't understand:Why alkali metals are so much electropositive. Some high school professor in chemistry would ...
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0answers
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Why doesn't core charge increase down a group? [closed]

Atomic radius increases down a group because the electrons feel a lesser attraction to the positive nucleus (due to shielding from inner shells). Why then, doesn't core charge decrease seeing as core ...
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2answers
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How come we can't use the equivalence point equation of NV=NV in this problem?

So, the problem is you prepare to standardize a $\ce{Na2S2O3}$ solution. $\pu{32 mL}$ of $\ce{Na2S2O3}$ solution is titrated into $\pu{50 mL}$ of a $\pu{0.01 M} \ \ce{KIO3}$ solution to reach the ...
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1answer
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Where do the electrons in lead–acid battery come from? [closed]

$$ \begin{align} \ce{PbO2 + H2SO4 &-> PbSO4 + H2O + O} &\quad &\text{(anode)}\\ \ce{Pb + H2SO4 &-> PbSO4 + H2} &\quad &\text{(cathode)} \end{align} $$ The cathode’s $\ce{...
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1answer
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Does an orbital have its own energy, separate from the electron? Can I picture them as a entity independent from the hosted particle? [closed]

Does an orbital have its own energy, separate from the electron? If so, is it possible for an electron to have a different energy than the orbital it occupies?
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Equilibrium cell potential question

In an attempt to wrap my head around the basics of electrochemistry I'm working my way through Wesley R. Browne's 'Electrochemistry' primer. With regards to the equilibrium potential of an ...
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Is my understanding of cyclic voltammetry correct? [closed]

So recently I've been roped into doing some CV and I'm trying to wrap my head around the fundamentals of the science behind it (and electrochemistry more generally! Bare in mind I'm very much not an ...
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How does actually negative charge travel in phenol from ortho to para to ortho? [duplicate]

When we say negative charge flows from ortho to para position, and electron density at ortho and para is more, where does electron actually stay at ortho and para? Is it at $p_\mathrm{z}$ orbital or ...
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0answers
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Difference in a array of probability density plots for the electron in its lowest-energy states of Hydrogen atom [closed]

Dynamic Periodic Table If you visit Dynamic Peridic Table, You will notice that for n=4 l=3,2 m=0,0, and n=2,l=1, m=0 there is a difference in the probability density plots for electron in its ...
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1answer
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Breaking of carbon chains due to annihilation of electrons using positron beams

I and my friends were taking part in a competition(physics and chem expertise needed) and we were having a few doubts about something. I was hoping if anyone of you can help in the clarification of ...
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0answers
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Term symbols for excited nitrogen (2s2p^4 configuration)

Looking at the NIST levels listing for neutral nitrogen atom, one of the excited configuration is $2s2p^4$ configuration. https://physics.nist.gov/cgi-bin/ASD/energy1.pl?encodedlist=XXT2&de=0&...
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1answer
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Electron arrangement in Nickel [duplicate]

I'm struggling to understand why the element Nickel can be written like so: [Ar]3d84s2, but cannot be written as [Ar]3d10. I know that the d-orbital can 'house' 10 electrons, and that according to ...
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0answers
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Photoelectric effect question

My attempt:- 1)At 0.68e15 Hz frequency of light,Metal A gives 7.2eV Kinetic Energy(KE). 2)At 1e15 Hz frequency of light, Metal B, gives 6eV Kinetic Energy. 3) At 1.1e15 Hz frequency of light, Metal ...

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