Questions tagged [noble-gases]

Questions about elements of group 18 (group 0 in old notation) of the periodic table and their compounds, created despite the low reactivity of these elements.

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Anomaly in van der Waals constants of noble gases

In van der Waals equation for a real gas, the equation is $$\left(P + a\frac{n^2}{V^2}\right)(V - nb) = nRT$$ where $P$ is the pressure of the real gas, $n$ is the number of moles of the gas, $R$ is ...
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Why $ns^2np^6$configuration so stable? [duplicate]

In my chemistry textbook it is said that noble gases have stable configuration because they have achieved the maximum outermost shell configuration, which corresponds to the $ns^2np^6$ configuration. ...
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Why does the earth have more radon in some locations?

I am not a chemist so I'm not going to give specific amounts of radon; different countries use different units. My question: why do some areas have more radon? For instance, Australia has a ...
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Electric glow discharge of last 2 noble gasses

Radon is an extremely unstable noble gas. Due to this, putting it in a gas discharge lamp for a prolonged period of time is extreme hard, as pure radon is needed to give a true color, but radon decays ...
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Argon vs nitrogen for preserving wine

I have a question regarding whether argon or nitrogen is to prefer when it comes to preserving wine. Specifically, I am interested in knowing if there is a difference in preservation periods. Also, ...
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What is the explanation of the structure of H2XeO4?

Using the obsolete VSEPR theory I had a hard time predicting the structure of $\ce{H2XeO4}$. So I looked it up. I found the molecule via chemapps.stolaf.edu: It looks weird to me. I can't explain the ...
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Are there known compounds of caesium with oxidation number >1?

Given that the left neighbor of caesium, xenon, does have fluorides and oxides, it is not inconceivable that caesium can have oxides or fluorides with an oxidation number higher than 1. Are such ...
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Influence of the neighbouring molecules in a crystal at the example of XeF4

For reasons of symmetry I (without deeper chemical knowledge) supposed, that $\ce{XeF4}$ has a shape like $\ce{CH4}$. But according to Wikipedia its crystalline structure was determined by both NMR ...
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Why is helium considered as a non-metal?

How can helium be considered as a non-metal based on its chemical properties? Helium is a noble gas; it does not take part in chemical reactions under ordinary conditions. But non-metals tend to gain ...
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Do XeF2 and XeF4 react with SiO2?

A question came in my test asking which of the compounds are not stored in glass. The answers were $\ce {HF, XeF6, XeF4, XeF2}$. I know about $\ce {HF} $ and $\ce {XeF6} $ but not about the other two. ...
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Does the hydrohelium dication exist?

It is well-known that there exists the $\ce{He2^2+}$ dication, and also $\ce{HHe+}$ and $\ce{H2+}$ cations. But I could not find any definite information about the existence or inexistence of the $\ce{...
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Acids of noble gases

Are there any other acids of noble gasses besides xenic acid? Why other ones seem to be very unstable (like perxenic), or completely unknown (acids of any other noble gases). Particularly are there ...
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Forging steel inside a zero oxygen environment

Intro: I have watched one too many blacksmithing videos and now I have a question: is it possible to forge steel (either just reshape or "forge-weld") inside a no-oxygen environment? Scenario: ...
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For a given period, why is the boiling point of the halogen greater than that of the noble gas?

The boiling point of bromine, a halogen, is $\pu{58.8^\circ C}$, while the boiling point of krypton, the noble gas in the same period as bromine, is $\pu{-153.4 ^\circ C}$. I thought that the larger ...
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Why is zinc not considered to have a noble gas configuration?

I am wondering why we say that, for example, zinc does not have a noble gas configuration? I would like to say beforehand that this question may has its origin in a confusion about the word "shell" ...
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616 views

Why is the oxidation state of Carbon (-4)?

Based on my understanding, atoms try to achieve the electronic configuration of the nearest noble gas, by losing or gaining electrons. For example, Sodium is closest to Neon, so loses an electron so ...
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What happens to the argon in the Haber-Bosch process?

The Haber–Bosch process is used to synthesis ammonia from atmospheric nitrogen and hydrogen derived from a hydrocarbon such as methane. The process requires high temperatures and pressures and also ...
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Why is xenon hexafluoride not stored in glass?

Why is $\ce{XeF_6}$ not stored in glass containers? Isn't the reason glass is used for most acids is that it is non-reactive?
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Ar atomic radius Vs. Mg2+, Al3+ and F-

I find it difficult to understand why the Atomic radius of $\ce{Ar}$ is lower than the ionic radius of $\ce{Mg^2+}$ and $\ce{F-}$, and higher than $\ce{Al^3+}$. According to the tables I've seen: $$\...
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What is the molecular structure of xenon hexafluoride?

Xenon hexafluoride, $\ce{XeF6}$, can be obtained by reaction of xenon with excess fluorine gas. What is the gas-phase structure of the molecule? What experimental evidence is there to support it, ...
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What makes for a good 'swimmer' in order see the filling level of Xenon gas in a vessel?

Most foams will probably get heavier due to diffusion. Is there glass balls this thin?
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What is the effect of Helium-based surroundings (99% Helium) on electrochemical gas sensors?

I am currently working on a project measuring gas composition of car exhaust. In order to dilute the gas concentration down to something electrochemical sensors can read, I diluted the sample with ...
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How do molecules know how to behave when a disturbance occurs in an equilibrium?

I am well aware of Le Chatelier's principle, but what causes molecules to behave in such a way, my guess is that it all has to do with rates of reactions and frequency of collisions. When at a ...
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662 views

How come noble gases have full outer shells? [closed]

Argon has $18$ electrons overall and $8$ in the outer shell. But the $3^{rd}$ shell is supposed to have $18$ electrons. Please use A-level terms so that I can understand.
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Bonding of Lithium and Argon

I saw a meme that was joking around about Lithium and Argon bonding (see pic below). It got me wondering: Can Lithium and Argon bond in any circumstance?
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What is the structure of the hypothetical xenon octafluoride?

According to Frlec et al.,[1] theoretical studies indicated that there is a possibility (albeit slim) that neutral xenon octafluoride ($\ce{XeF8}$) might exist. I am curious as to what structure this ...
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Do argon have a high energy? [closed]

Do argon have a large energy density? And what level is it on? Is it weak or have a density like gasoline. How much energy can argon store and what noble gas have the highest energy density?
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What happens chemically to 5'-radiolabeled aqueous thyroxine (thyroid prohormone) when its I-131 undergoes beta+gamma decay?

Related to this question about $\ce{^{14}C}$ beta decay in $\ce{CO2}$, what happens when the $\ce{^{131}I}$ in radiolabeled thyroxine (thyroid prohormone, or "T$_4$") undergoes beta-plus-gamma decay ...
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a structure of compound related question [duplicate]

Why the structure of XeF6 is capped octahedral but not pentagonal pyramidal although there is a possibility of being pentagonal pyramidal (with lone pair below the pyramid) ?
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Structure of xenon hexafluoride

The central atom has a hybridization of $\mathrm{sp^3d^3}$. Thus, its structure should be pentagonal bipyramidal. Why is it not that but a distorted octahedron?
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Trend in atomic radius for noble gases

In an exam, we were given the following graph and asked to explain why the slope of the change in r vs. Z changes dramatically at a point along the curve. I understand that the d block causes the ...
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396 views

Explain why the noble gas Kr does follow the general trend for covalent radii

Looking at covalent radii I know the trend states that as you move from LEFT to RIGHT the radii decreases due to increased nuclear charge. Up until you hit the noble gasses like neon. Neon does not ...
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van der Waals coefficients for helium and neon

The values of the coefficient $b$ for helium and neon are $$\begin{array}{cc} \hline \text{Element} & b\text{ / }\mathrm{dm^3\ mol^{-1}} \\ \hline \ce{He} & 2.38 \times 10^{-2} \\ \ce{Ne} &...
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Is a compound composed out of gold, manganese, xenon, krypton, and oxalate possible?

Please keep in mind while reading this that I do not intend to create this, it is part of the backstory for a video game I am producing. I created a compound based on knowledge from my chemistry ...
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Electronegativity of noble gases [duplicate]

SO, I stumbled upon a periodic table of electronegativity- http://www.thecatalyst.org/electabl.html Now I don't understand why the first 3 noble gases have blank spaces instead of the ...
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What reactions produce lots of Helium?

I'm working on a pet project and I'll need some helium. I was wondering if there were any reactions that I could perform at home to produce helium cheaper than it would be to buy helium from someone ...
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Compound with a bright green emission when electrically excited

I rolled back the edit because I really am looking for the following: I am looking for an element or compound that would have a bright green emission when electrically excited and is a gas at between ...
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Why most of the atoms with fully filled outer orbits are gaseous?

Most of the elements with fully filled outer orbits are gaseous in nature (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) with exception of Uuo (as per Wikipedia its solid). Why these fully filled outer orbit elements are ...
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Why do XeO and XeF8 not exist?

Since Neil Bartlett's 1962 discovery that xenon was capable of forming chemical compounds, a large number of xenon compounds have been discovered and described. Almost all known xenon compounds ...
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High Viscosity of Noble Gases

Why are the viscosities of noble gases higher than almost all other gases? This seems counter-intuitive since they have much weaker inter-molecular interactions and lower boiling points. Gas ...
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Why are noble gases 'gases'?

Why do group 18 elements exist as gases, why are they not found in any other physical state ?
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London Forces and Liquifying Noble Gases

From my book, it says that 'without van der Waals (London Dispersion) forces, it would be impossible to liquefy noble gases.' Why is this the case?
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Why are noble gases used in “neon” lamps

Neon lamps are lamps that contain noble gases... They light due to the presence of energetic levels for electrons (according to the definition of it in books). But I don't understand yet why noble ...
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Why do noble gases like Xe and Kr form compounds, despite offending the octet rule?

According to the octet rule noble gases should not form compounds but xenon and krypton form compounds like $\ce{XeF2}$, $\ce{XeF4}$, $\ce{XeOF2}$ and $\ce{KrF2}$ respectively. Why?
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Why can't helium nuclei (alpha particles) react with fluorine?

Alpha particles are basically just helium nuclei, so it will accept an electron pair to become stable. Will fluorine, being highly electronegative, not just donate an electron pair but form a bond ...
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Is There an Acceptable Potential Which Can Represent the Interaction between Finite-sized Ions?

The question is as mentioned in the title. Take for example the interaction between $\ce{Ar^+}$ and $\ce{Ar^+}$. In general, is there an acceptable potential which can represent the interaction ...
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Can you in reality give neon a charge of +8?

First off, I am currently confused about why neon can even be ionized at all. But since it can be ionized, this is the energy required to give a mole of neon a charge of +8: ...
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Stable natural helium hydride?

Reading the transcript of the Royal Society of Chemistry podcast Helium Hydride, they state that helium hydride is possibly the most ancient compound to form in the Universe. They make the assertion ...
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Comparison of atomic radii

My teacher told me that Neon has a larger atomic radius than Fluorine.I am of the understanding that it is merely a consequence of the way we define the atomic radius and that we use Van der walls ...
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Why are there more fluoride compounds formed with Xenon?

Based on WebElements, of the Noble Gases, $\ce{He}$ and $\ce{Ne}$ do not react with any of the halogens; however: $\ce{HArF}$ has been detected at low temperatures (thank you to @bon and @Martin in ...