Questions tagged [alkali-metals]

For questions about the alkali metals (group 1), their compounds, and their physical and chemical properties. For questions specifically about hydrogen, use tag [hydrogen] instead.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
1answer
70 views

What reaction could rubidium undergo in a vacuumed chamber with Macor ceramic and glass?

In the center of the chamber on the photo below you can see the hexagonally-shaped Macor glass-ceramic consisting of Silicon dioxide $\ce{SiO2}~46\%$ Magnesium dioxide $\ce{MgO}~17\%$ Aluminum ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

The boiling points of Alkali metal group

As I know, the melting points of Alkali metals decrease down to the group due to decreasing of the energy of the metallic bond. But according to my understanding, after it has become to liquid the ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

How to obtain sodium oxide from sodium chloride?

Under what conditions can $\ce{Na2O}$ be made from $\ce{NaCl}?$ I know $\ce{NaCl}$ doesn't oxidise under normal ambient conditions, but in the presence of what temperature and pressure ranges is this ...
6
votes
1answer
176 views

Volatile alkali metal compounds

Most elements are or have compounds that are gases or have a significant vapor pressure at room temperature. Fluoride is a powerful tool for producing highly oxidized covalent and volatile compounds. ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

What is the Reactivity order of alkali metals towards hydrogen?

I had read that reactivity of alkali metals towards oxygen is increasing down the group.But the reactivity of the alkali metals decrease down the group towards hydrogen. The reason given in my book is ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Make Na or K using carbonate + charcoal?

In the 19th century, Na metal was isolated by heating up Na2CO3 + carbon to 1200 C and distilling and capturing the Na vapor under oil. I tried it a few years ago with a small steel tube welded at ...
4
votes
1answer
231 views

Why does concentration of solutions of alkali metals in liquid ammonia change the magnetic properties?

In "NCERT Chemistry for Class XI - Volume II", in chapter "s-block elements", under the topic "Chemical Properties of alkali metals", it is given: (vi) Solutions in liquid ammonia: The alkali ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Sodium + water reaction, noxious fumes?

I was reacting pure sodium and tap water, and at one point I put some splattered sodium back into the water. I observed fumes that reacted with my respiratory system, producing a burning sensation. I ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Nature of the bonding in hexaaquaaluminium complex

$\ce {[Al(H2O)6]^3+}$ is a well-known complex ion formed by the $\ce {Al^3+}$. I have always had the understanding that only the aqua complexes of transition metal ions, such as $\ce {[Fe(H2O)6]^3+}$, ...
-1
votes
1answer
79 views

Would dissolving Mg in NH3 help me purify Mg from all elements other than Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Fr, Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu and Yb? [closed]

According to Wikipedia all of the alkali metals, as well as $\ce{Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu,}$ and $\ce{Yb}$ (also $\ce{Mg}$ using an electrolytic process[4]), dissolve in ammonia to give the characteristic blue ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Hydration, Coordinate Bonding, and Reduction Potential in Groups 1 and 2 Elements [closed]

Whenever an alkali metal such as Lithium is hydrated/solvated, coordinate bonding occurs and it is the high hydration enthalpy of lithium which makes it the strongest reducing agent in aqueous ...
1
vote
1answer
250 views

Reaction of potassium with water

In general, when we put potassium into water, it will produce potassium hydroxide and hydrogen: $\ce{2K + 2H2O ⟶2KOH + H2}$ However isn't the following reaction also possible? $\ce{2K + H2O ⟶K2O + ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

What's the densest alkali metal?

This was asked in a school exam of mine, GCSE curriculum, exactly as it was worded on the title. I found this question a bit vague, and answered it francium, however of course francium is just an ...
3
votes
0answers
53 views

What is the pale green solution from dissolving sodium hydroxide in a stainless steel flask?

I have previously used drain/sink cleaner gel based on sodium hydroxide but noticed that caustic soda crystals were a lot cheaper. I decided to experiment with making my own cleaner. I bought a 1 ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Are there known compounds of caesium with oxidation number >1?

Given that the left neighbor of caesium, xenon, does have fluorides and oxides, it is not inconceivable that caesium can have oxides or fluorides with an oxidation number higher than 1. Are such ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Why is the reason for color different in these two cases? [closed]

I have read in a book (NCERT India) about flame color for salts of alkali metal and color of transition metal complexes. In the first case, it says that during excitation of electrons to higher ...
1
vote
0answers
68 views

Potassium ethoxide

Is it possible to make potassium ethoxide by mixing $\ce{KOH}$ and $\ce{EtOH}$ in the presence of a dehydrating agent like $\ce{MgSO4}$ or $\ce{CaO}$ or $\ce{K2CO3}$? The easy way is adding metallic ...
8
votes
2answers
120 views

Flame Test Spectrograms Not Lining Up With Reality

In my AS Level chemistry class we had tried some DIY spectroscopy of flame tests with the aim of identifying anions in certain salts. We got as far as building the spectrometer inspired by Paper Craft ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

Does aluminum oxide react with rubidium?

I have rubidium vapor inside of the vacuum chamber. Inside the vacuum chamber, there are two flat stainless steel coated with aluminum oxide at temperature ~100 °C. Since rubidium is active, I am ...
4
votes
1answer
148 views

Unusual oxidation states of alkali metals

When going through list of oxidation states on Wikipedia I encounterd there that sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium exhibit oxidation states of -1, but not lithium, even though its ...
2
votes
0answers
64 views

Why doesn't lithium form dilithium crystals? (Calling Mr.Spock) [duplicate]

Hydrogen is in the first column of the periodic table. At STP it is a diatomic gas. When cooled and/or under pressure it forms a crystalline solid of di-hydrogen molecules. Calculations indicate that ...
8
votes
1answer
110 views

Are crown ethers “recycled”, typically?

I know that crown ethers have the interesting property of strongly complexing alkali metals, which allows them to be used in organic solvents (eg. as "dissolving-activity enhancing agents" for ...
1
vote
1answer
144 views

Does the van der Waals force not affect the alkali metal 's trend of decreasing melting points down the table? [duplicate]

Melting and boiling points increase further down the halogen group, but they decrease further down the alkali metal group. I know that the former's trend has to do with the van der Waals force, but I ...
15
votes
2answers
267 views

Does exotic potassium exist?

I was reading a book called 'Hundred and Seven Stories of Chemistry'. There is a chapter about how the attributes of different elements can change in presence of enormous pressure and temperature. ...
2
votes
1answer
13k views

Alkali metal carbonates, their thermal stability and solubility [duplicate]

From Li to Cs, thermal stability of carbonates increases. From Li to Cs, due to larger ion size, hydration enthalpy decreases. So, solubility should decrease from Li to Cs. But, experimentally, order ...
3
votes
1answer
836 views

Coordination number of carbon in methyllithium tetramer

According to J. D. Lee's Concise Inorganic Chemistry, the coordination number of carbon in $\ce{Li4(CH3)4}$ is $7$. But the structure of the tetramer is Doesn't carbon have coordination number $6$ ...
4
votes
1answer
18k views

Why do the boiling and melting points decrease as you go down group 1 and vice versa for group 7?

I used to think that because an alkali metal needs to lose one electron to complete its outer shell, when the atom increases in size (atomic radius), the electron would be easier to lose as the ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Which of sodium or lithium will be more reactive with oxygen?

I do not understand how you can work out which element will react more readily with another element. For example, I have lithium (Li) and sodium (Na) and I am trying to work out which element will ...