Skip to main content

Questions tagged [electronic-configuration]

In atomic physics and quantum chemistry, the electron configuration is the distribution of electrons of an atom or molecule (or other physical structure) in atomic or molecular orbitals.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-3 votes
1 answer
44 views

Question from J. D. Lee about Quantum Numbers

There's this question in J. D. Lee: Concise Inorganic Chemistry, which I haven't understood exactly. Which of the following may have the same set of quantum numbers? The last electron of scandium and ...
Schrödinger's Cat's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
52 views

Electron Affinity Trends in Period 2

I'm new to this forum, but I had a question about electron affinity. In the second period, why do electron affinity trends feel so random? In this series, the first three terms made sense to me. ...
Schrödinger's Cat's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
104 views

What does "predicted" mean in an electronic configuration?

I've noticed the term "(predicted)" appearing at the end of electron configurations for heavier elements. Could you explain what it signifies and the reason behind it? I haven't been able to ...
uggupuggu's user avatar
  • 132
-2 votes
0 answers
34 views

Why is the concept of penetration power only applied to Be and B, and not to Be and C, N, O, F?

In my book, it is stated that the ionization energy of Be is greater than that of B because the electron removed in Be is in the 2s orbital, while the electron removed in B is in the 2p orbital. This ...
Peter swift's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
34 views

How is the electronic configuration of elements determined practically? [duplicate]

How is the electronic configuration of elements determined in practical? Theoretically, we use certain rules (Aufbau principle, Pauli exclusion principle, and Hund's rule) to define the electronic ...
Bilal Malik's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
77 views

Does ionisation change the physical/chemical properties of an atom?

From what I have learned, the number of electrons on the outermost shell (called the valence electrons), determines the chemical properties of an atom, this is why elements in the same group have ...
user144179's user avatar
-3 votes
2 answers
68 views

Electronic Configuration of Atomic Numbers 20-28 and 29 (Calcium - Nickel) and Copper [closed]

I have always been confused as to why elements of atomic numbers 20-28, i.e., Calcium to Nickel have 2 valence electrons in their outer shell. Starting from Potassium, why is one electron present in ...
S.A's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
1 answer
67 views

Why are Mo(NR2)3 complexes isolobal with the nitrogen atom in N2

In a Molybdenum complex of the form Mo(NR2)3, the Mo is in the oxidation state of +3, leaving it with 3 d electrons. When combined with an additional 2*3 electrons from the ligands, this leaves it ...
Kirandk's user avatar
  • 412
1 vote
0 answers
120 views

Cation/Anion UV-Vis absorption

I want to understand how the ground state absorption of a molecule shifts if an electron is added or removed. I found these two publications 1 and 2 that observe shifts, but both times a redshift, be ...
Martin 's user avatar
  • 141
1 vote
1 answer
104 views

How did scientists prove that electron configuration was true if we do not know exactly where electrons are? [closed]

In Wikipedia, there is an entry for electron configurations which explains all about them, but I did not find from this article how they were discovered. If we take into account Schrodinger's quantum ...
suse's user avatar
  • 803
0 votes
0 answers
91 views

Jahn-Teller Distortion: How to compare magnitudes (in Cu2+ complexes)?

Octahedral complex of copper(II) undergo structural distortion (Jahn-Teller). Which one of the given copper(II) complexes will who the maximum structural distortion? (en - ethylenediamine) (A) $[Cu(...
magneticMono_Poal247's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
133 views

Non-octet structures of stable nitrogen compounds

A question in my exercise book demonstrates that nitrogen cannot form non-octet structures since the most common examples — nitrogen dioxide and nitrogen monoxide — are unstable/reactive. For example, ...
Freeby Freeby's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
158 views

Radius of Ag+ and K+

According to the database of ionic radius Database of ionic radius The ionic radius of silver(I) cation is totally smaller than potassium(I), regardless of their coordination number. It seems quite ...
Shira's user avatar
  • 543
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

When relaxing the strong field interaction, the (t2g)^2 configuration splits into 4 states. What is the symbolic configuration of the Eg state?

When relaxing the infinitely strong field, the electrons start to feel one another's presence. They will, therefore, give rise to sets of states such as T1g, T2g... for the (t2g)^2 initial ...
Viliam Philippe Frano's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
137 views

Convergence limit of emission spectra for atoms with multiple electrons

In high school chemistry, students are taught that the convergence limit in the emission spectrum of an element can be used to determine the first ionization energy. However, what about the second, ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 249
4 votes
1 answer
270 views

Eigenfunctions of total angular momenta as linear combinations of Slater-determinants

In the Hartree scheme for many-electron atoms, the approximated Hamiltonian (in a.u.) $$\hat{H} = \sum_{i=1}^Z \left(-\frac{1}{2} \nabla_i^2 -\frac{Z}{r_i} + V_\text{H}\left(r_i\right)\right)$$ is ...
Simone's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
1 answer
273 views

Principal quantum number and 'good' quantum numbers

When we discuss about configurations we specify n, l, m quantum numbers for the individual electrons. My question is: why when we pass from configurations to atomic terms in order to use the total ...
Chemistry.'s user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
487 views

Why is iron(III) more stable than iron(II)?

What I have seen, and what has been answered before (Why Fe 3+ is more common than Fe 2+), is that it is due to the half filled d orbital of $\ce{Fe^3+}$ compared to $\ce{Fe^2+}$. I don't understand ...
Ariichu's user avatar
  • 21
-2 votes
1 answer
109 views

D block elements and the cation of cobalt [closed]

The configuration of cobalt in its ground state is $\ce{[Ar] 4s^2 3d^7}$. when it loses 2 electrons, it supposedly leaves from s orbital making it $\ce{[Ar] 4s^0 3d^7}$. But since the s and d orbital ...
Nived Aryampilly's user avatar
-2 votes
3 answers
160 views

Why is there a non-uniformity in even the reasons that explain exceptions in the trends in chemistry? [closed]

I have been studying the periodic table and several properties of atoms like the Ionization Energy, Atomic Radii, Electron gain enthalpy, Electronegativity etc. Now, each property has somewhat of a &...
Bhavya Jain's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
125 views

Confusion about the number of microstates for orbitals

I am very confused about the microstates for a specific orbital. Let's suppose I have an electronic configuration $$ \ce{[\dots] 2p^5} $$ Considering the symmetry of the orbitals and the "...
Kubrik's user avatar
  • 79
-2 votes
1 answer
90 views

How many m values are there for the 4f sublevel. In high school so no fancy words please! [closed]

How many m values are there for the 4f sublevel? In high school so no fancy words please!
Hope Dively's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

How can one obtain the same-spin and opposite-spin terms of the MP2 energy by integrating out the spin?

Just as specified on the psi4 website here: https://psicode.org/psi4manual/master/dfmp2.html, the Moller-Plesset Perturbation Theory states that the second order correction to the ground state energy, ...
Myxo123's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

Why does XeO3 not hybridize d orbitals? [duplicate]

Apologies if this is a dumb question. In my chemistry class we are discussing hybridization, and an example that came up for $sp_3$ hybridization was the compound $\ce{XeO3}$. However, this seems ...
Max0815's user avatar
  • 323
2 votes
0 answers
33 views

LCAO-MO ansatz for arbitrary hydrogenic molecule term

I am struggling to understand the connection between molecular electronic term symbols and translating the symmetries to the underlying wavefunction. In particular, my understanding of the LCAO-MO ...
Szgoger's user avatar
  • 284
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

On the energies of molecular orbitals

I found a useful (though simplified) scheme illustrating the energies of atomic orbitals, in crescent order: I wonder if there was an analogous (simplified) scheme or rule for molecular orbitals, at ...
ric.san's user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
0 answers
725 views

Which one has higher priority in CIP rules -- O or OH?

I know that if the atom is the same, I have to look at the next atom. In the first choice, Oxygen is not connected to any other atom (besides the chiral carbon). It is an anion. Whereas in the second ...
songgio123's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

What determines the higher priority in CIP rules, if both groups have the same atoms?

Which of the following groups has the highest priority in the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog sequence rules? a) CH2CH3 b) CH=CH2 c) C≡CH d) C(CH3)3 I narrowed it down to either C or D. The carbon in answer C is ...
songgio123's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
781 views

sp mixing in $N_2$ vs sp mixing in CO

We were first taught that in B, C and N the bonding $\sigma_{2s}$ orbital repels with the bonding $\sigma_{2p}$ orbital which cause the energy level of $\sigma_{2p}$ orbital to increase. This increase ...
Pumpkin_Star's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
122 views

How can Planck’s equation and the wave equation simultaneously coexist with contradicting each other? [closed]

The equations: E=hf (Planck’s equation, where E is the energy, h is the Planck’s constant and f is the frequency) and V=fλ (where v is the speed (in a vacuum), f is frequency and λ is the wavelength) ...
Kirandk's user avatar
  • 412
2 votes
0 answers
85 views

Hartree Fock calculations on F2 don't match the traditionally taught MO diagram

I ran some Hartree-Fock calculations on F2 to visualize the MOs, and the energy levels don't match the trend commonly taught (shown here: https://chem.libretexts.org/Courses/...
Brian's user avatar
  • 21
-1 votes
2 answers
431 views

Why is the d subshell only stable when all of its orbitals are filled? [closed]

I was learning about the Aufbau principle and quantum electronic configuration. Here are some of the yet-unanswered queries that I wish to know the answers to. I discovered that the d subshell is ...
Chinmay Krishna's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
227 views

Why does berkelium have two electronic configurations?

J.D. Lee Concise Inorganic Chemistry, Appendix E: Electronic Structures of the Elements [1, p. 601] provides two electronic configurations for berkelium: $$ \ce{Bk}\quad \begin{cases} [\ce{Rn}]~\...
Aayush Srivastava's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

How does bond formation affect the energetics of the bond?

I am an 11th grade student who has just started learning about bonds in compounds. My question pertains to a line written in JD Lee's Concise Inorganic Chemistry for JEE (Main and Advanced) It was ...
Fiziks's user avatar
  • 29
-2 votes
2 answers
699 views

Why silicon doesn't have the electronic configuration [Ne] 3s¹ 3p³?

I have read that half or fully filled orbitals provide more stability to the element due to symmetry and exchange energy.It is the reason for electronic configuration of Cr-[Ar]4s¹3d⁵. Then, why doesn'...
j sivesh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
167 views

Electronic configuration of Cu⁺ and Cu²⁺ [duplicate]

I understand that copper has the electronic configuration $\ce{[Ar] 4s^1 3d^10}$ because a fully filled $\ce{4d}$ orbital provide a more stable configuration. But I don't understand why the two copper ...
sushant_padha's user avatar
-5 votes
1 answer
72 views

What is the energy difference between inner subshells?

For exemple, in silver the energy difference between the 4d 5s subshells is ≈ 4 eV (in the ultraviolet region, that's why it has no color, etc.), but what is the energy difference between some of its ...
Walter Grosse's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
131 views

Why does lead gains electrons in the cathode? [closed]

In lead(II) bromide electrolysis, lead is attracted to the cathode and gains electrons. Why does it gain electrons when losing them would be easier since its charge is +2 meaning it would need to lose ...
Dee's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
51 views

Analog of chemical accuracy in vibronic energy calculation [closed]

Is there any analog of chemical accuracy in vibronic energy calculation? I understand that the unit is /cm however, probably, I shouldn't expect a given number in that unit as the analog. I am ...
Omar Shehab's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Why are there so many metals in the periodic table?

Brief Background: I was studying about the 'classical electronic configuration' of the first 20 elements of the periodic table today and was bewildered by the fact that there are an equal number of ...
Chinmay Krishna's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
223 views

Why the electronic configuration of samarium is ending with 4f⁶6s²

What is coming in my mind is that 4f^7 6s^1 should be more stable as it allows two orbitals to be half filled rather than 4f^6 6s^2 in which only one orbital is completely filled....can someone please ...
Ved's user avatar
  • 73
1 vote
2 answers
203 views

Electronic configuration in d-block

According to Bohr-Bury rule, 4f and 5d orbital come after 6s orbital. But if I search for the electronic configuration for Os or any atom in d block for that matter, they give the electronic ...
user126352's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
240 views

where could I find the standard atomic orbital energy of all elements?

I am trying to find the standard atomic orbital energy of all elements. Here is the data I found in some old books: I am looking for some more modernized data, I tried to look for the data in the CRC ...
Jack's user avatar
  • 73
3 votes
1 answer
629 views

Fundamental doubts about energy levels vs. shells vs. subshells vs. orbitals

First in school I learnt that when supplied enough energy, the electron in a hydrogen atom will jump energy level(s), denoted by $n=1$, $n=2$ and so on for integral values of $n$. Then I learnt about ...
AVS's user avatar
  • 481
-3 votes
2 answers
92 views

Are there any monocations with negative electron affinities known?

It is known that most dianions are unbound per se, i.e. that the corresponding monoanions have negative electron affinities, and the "dianions" we see in e.g. metal oxides can exist as such ...
Kanghun Kim's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
338 views

Why does symmetrical distribution of electrons in d and f orbital lead to greate stability of these or orbitals in comparison to s orbital? [closed]

My high school textbook mentions the following as on of the reason for why Cr and Cu have thier 3d orbitals filled completely before their 4s orbital. The extra stability of d and f orbital is due to:...
Akhil Kumar Singh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

Do diatomic isoelectronic molecules have the same bond order even when the octet rule is not followed?

It can be observed and proven that diatomic isoelectronic molecules have the same bond order when they follow the octet rule (upto 3rd period elements). But what about when they do not follow the ...
Balu's user avatar
  • 73
0 votes
1 answer
392 views

Why is it wrong to draw the Lewis structure of a molecule's atoms and then figure out the Lewis structure of that molecule

When drawing for example the Lewis structure of nitrate ion (NO3)^-1 whould it be wrong to draw nitrogen and oxygen separately and then try to figure out the structure of the ion? In that case does ...
CaptainAmerica Whyso's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
35 views

How do the spin-matrices change in systems without spherical symmetry?

The (non-relativistic) spin matrices of a free electron, with $z$ as the quantization axis, read: $$ \boldsymbol{S}_{x}=\frac{\hbar}{2}\left[\begin{array}{ll} 0 & 1 \\ 1 & 0 \end{array}\right],...
Logi's user avatar
  • 181
4 votes
0 answers
112 views

How to obtain excited state energies from configuration interaction? (Helium example)

A theory of CI method For going beyond the Hartree–Fock (one determinant) approximation one introduce configuration interaction (CI). Interaction means the mixing (interaction) of different electronic ...
Sergio's user avatar
  • 915

1
2 3 4 5
12