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The ammine ligand is not really a strong-field ligand. It is not a strong π acceptor which is characteristic of strong-field ligands such as the nitrosyl cation or carbonyl. Instead, it is a weak π donor. Quite unlike other strong-field ligands such as cyanide, there are a great number of high-spin complexes with ammine ligands. Ammine (and aqua) ...


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First and hopefully obvious things first: sulphate ions do form (weak) coordinate bonds to metal centres and thus by definition cause some d orbital splitting. In a simplified crystal field model, you might imagine them as weaker negative charges but nonetheless the do interact or we would not see the structures we see. Comparing the structures of anhydrous ...


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Octahedral complexes are somewhat of a ‘standard’ for transition-metal complexes. Not only can they happen if there are too few electrons to satisfy the 18-electron rule (e.g. $\ce{[Ti(H2O)6]^3+}$, a $\mathrm d^1$ complex) but also if there are too many electrons to satisfy the 18-electron rule (Jahn-Teller distorted $\ce{[Cu(H2O)6]^2+}$, a $\mathrm d^9$ ...


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