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1

A lot of questions in here. It also states that in heavier elements the inner electrons move with a speed approaching the speed of light. So why don't we consider the great amount of kinetic energy associated with the electron? If we consider this energy then the inner orbitals should not be filled first owing to their great amount of energy? In the ...


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Once $\ce{Ba^2+}$ is eliminated as poorly soluble barium(II) sulfate, there is a solution of soluble copper(II) and zinc(II) sulfates. Considering this has been done by careful/gradual addition of sulfuric acid, and the fact that both remaining sulfates undergo hydrolysis, the solution is going to be slightly acidic — this is one reason for sodium hydroxide "...


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$$\ce{Mn^{2+} + Cr2O7^{2-} -> Mn^{3+} + Cr^{3+}}$$ If you were to balance this reaction, using the appropriate molecules of water and protons, you'd get: $$\ce{ Mn^{2+} + Cr2O7^{2-} + 14H+ + 5e- -> Mn^{3+} + 2Cr^{3+} + 7H2O }$$ The presence of protons the left side of equation suggests that this reaction has a higher rate when the concentration of ...


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All metals look black or dark when presented as a sufficiently thin powder. The metals display their color only when the dimension of the grain is greater than the wavelength of the light, namely 400 to 700 nm. This is about 1000 times bigger than the atoms. When prepared from a precipitation reaction, the metal atoms are never arranged neatly in a regular ...


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The explanation given to you is rather incorrect. Dilute sulfuric acid is added to iron(II) or even iron(III) salts is added to prevent hydrolysis of the salts. What happens when you don't add an acid to iron(II) solution in water. With time, you will see that a brown precipitate is forming and settling to the bottom. Iron forms hydroxides which are very ...


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