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3

I think the mistake you're making is this conclusion: "Higher atomic charge. . . -> higher electron density -> more pi-backbonding". With higher (ie more positive or less negative) atomic charge, there is less electron density donation towards the ligand, because the electron density is pulled to the metal center more strongly. Thus, $\pi$ back-bonding is ...


4

It may depend on who you ask, and maybe even when you ask. The tl, dr of what is below is that we are moving towards counting scandium as a transition metal. Wikipedia follows the IUPAC definition and accepts the label for scandium because it forms atoms with partially filled $d$ orbitals, and also copper because it forms ions with partially filled $d$ ...


1

It appears that Sørensen was the first to publish the synthesis of trioxalatocobaltate(III) trihydrate [1]. A summary written in English (and that should answer both of your questions) including chemical reactions can be found in the very first volume of Inorganic Syntheses1 [2, p. 37]: C. POTASSIUM TRIOXALATOCOBALTIATE $$\ce{K3[Co(C2O4)3]·3H2O}$$ ...


0

In the first step, one makes an oxalate complex by decomposing the carbonate salt of cobalt (II) with oxalic acid. I am not sure how an oxalate salt will decompose the carbonate to carbon dioxide. Oxalate ion makes a complex. The second step is lead dioxide oxidation. See this book chapter for proper synthesis equations of cobalt (III) oxalate complex, ...


22

On negative oxidation states, in general Although it's usually a topic that's covered relatively late in a chemistry education, negative oxidation states for transition metals[1] are actually quite alright. On the Wikipedia list of oxidation states, there are quite a number of negative oxidation states. Some textbooks have tables which only show positive ...


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