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7

None of the US coins are magnetic (Ferromagnetic), except for the 1943 Lincoln penny (Steel Cents, made in steel and zinc to save copper for ammunition during wartime), which are considered magnetic. Almost all of those coins other than Steel Cents are made with higher percentage of copper ($\ce{Cu}$) and lower percentages of other metals such as nickel ($\...


-1

RE: "... And yet, No US coin is officially magnetic. ..." The 1943 Lincoln penny was steel coated zinc due to a copper shortage during WWII. It is ferromagnetic. There were a few copper blanks that got pressed in 1943 and these specimens are very valuable. A common scam was to plate a steel/zinc penny with copper. Such an altered coin is easily detected ...


13

There are many types of magnetic properties, including ferromagnetism, paramagnetism, diamagnetism, antiferromagnetism, ferrimagnetism, superparamagnetism, metamagnatism, and spin glasses. Many of these are too weak to cause noticeable interaction with a magnet. The type of everyday magnetism you're thinking of, which nickel has, is ferromagnetism. While ...


2

I think the answer given in your textbook is either incorrect or a misprint. I let you find out the correct answer from given choices. However, I'd like like to claim that the given answer is wrong because of following facts: Tris(ethylenediamine) complexes of transition metals have been studied for more than 100 years and $\ce{M(en)3^3+}$ complexes are ...


0

The calculations made by Kent de los Reyes are based on the hypothesis that the solvent (water) does not produce any $OH^-$ ions. He calculates that the concentrations of $OH^-$ is about $10^{-12}$ in saturated solutions of $Tl(OH)_3$ or $Co(OH)_3$. But the real concentration of $OH^-$ is much higher, because of the water dissociation. If the saturated ...


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