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Orbitals have negative energy, so closer to zero means higher energy. It is analogous to the energy of orbiting celestial objects. Orbital energy is the energy of an electron in quantum state related to the orbital.


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But that doesn't make sense, since the same thing is true in A! No, it isn’t; and identifying which of the two cases is true is precisely the key point to understanding when resonance can happen and when it cannot. First and foremost: we usually draw in two dimensions to represent three-dimensional molecules. Obviously, this is inadequate and often we need ...


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In figure B, nitrogen is $\mathrm{sp^{2}}$ hybridized which means that the lone pair sticking out from the ring is contained in a $\mathrm p$ orbital. This $\mathrm p$ orbital is geometrically restricted from interacting with the $\mathrm p$ orbital of the adjacent carbon. The $\mathrm p$ orbital containing the lone pair on nitrogen is in a different plane ...


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Indeed, if both complex A-C and complex B-C experience CT emission, the efficiency of CT character present in the complexes may be responsible for the difference in PLQY. This however, will be the case if there is no reverse in CT polarity (for example if in both complexes C is the acceptor (and emitter), this may also the reason for porphyrin's comment). ...


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Isolated in a vacuum, in the absence of external fields, the first configuration is correct - $[\ce{Ar}]\mathrm{(3d)^6(4s)^1}$ is the ground electronic state of the iron(I) cation $\ce{Fe^{+}}$. More specifically, the ground state also has the term symbol $\mathrm{^6D_{9/2}}$. NIST's Atomic Spectra Database has compiled the ground state electronic ...


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