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I'm not an inorganic chemist, but to my understanding, both cis- and trans-dioxalatodiaquochromate(III) ions exist (Note that some also called it as Diaquabis(Oxalato)Chromate (III)). According to what I found online is that solid state reaction gives cis-form while aqueous reaction predominantly forms trans-isomer (it is mentioned in one of your attachments)...


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Your thinking is correct. Within a set of degenerate orbitals (i.e. equal in energy), the orbitals will fill one electron at a time, and only after all have one electron will they start to pair up. The situation with $\ce{[Ni(CN)4]^{2-}}$ is that it has square planar geometry, so the two orbitals that are $e_g$ in an octahedral complex are separated in ...


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The inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD), by specifying that the structure contains only a single element, you can reduce the number of hits to 55. Structure examples are Cr, Po, Mn, Sb, Se, P, Ca, Li, As. Some are specific phases occurring at different temperature or pressures. So Po is not the ONLY metal to have a simple ...


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So basically, you're comparing a soft base and a hard base. In HSAB theory, a soft acid like Pd2+, would preferably react with a soft base like R-PH2. Soft acids and bases are easily polarized because of their size. Although, the possibility of the ligand acting as a bidentate can't be ignored, the P to Pd2+ interaction is thermodynamically favored than N to ...


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A metal phosphine complex, dichlorobis(triphenylphosphine)nickel(II) exists in two isomeric forms (blue and red) based on how you prepared it (Wikipedia). The blue isomer, which is paramagnetic can be prepared by treating hydrated nickel chloride ($\ce{NiCl2.6H2O}$) with triphenylphosphine in alcohols or glacial acetic acid. When allowed to crystallize from ...


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