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The polarity of a molecule is determined by both the polarity of its bonds and its structure. Since Na and Br have a large difference in electronegativity (0.93 for Na and 2.96 for Br), the bond should be polar. Also, since nitrogen has a lone pair of electrons, the molecule will have a trigonal pyramidal structure. An asymmetrical structure cannot cancel ...


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Neither the 1.7 electtonegativity difference rule nor the metal-nonmetal rule for ionic bonding is really correct, as Ivan points out in the comments. Following are some well-documented exceptions to both rules: The chart given here, illustrated below, shows potassium iodide has about 70% ionic character even though its electronegativity difference is only ...


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To check Aromaticity of a compound 4 criterias are to be checked Planarity : (Sp^2) Hybridised Conjugation: Compound should be fully conjugated Cyclic Hückel's Rule : There should be (4n+2)π electrons So the above compound is planar, conjugated , cyclic and follows Huckel's Rule as One lone pair of O and one of N add upto 10π electrons which can be done ...


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According to Huckel's rule Four Criteria for Aromaticity The molecule needs to be (1) planar, (2) cyclic, (3) fully conjugated, and has (4) 4n+2 electrons. Your molecule does not seem to be planar (b/c of N and O atoms) but assuming that it has a nearly planar conformation it satisfies all other criteria. You only need to count one of Oxygen's lone pair and ...


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Bonds are in general not maxima of the electron probability distribution. Local maxima are typically centered at the nuclei. This is due to the Coloumb potential. The electron can lower its potential energy by getting closer to the nuclei so they will always try to maximize their probability around the nuclei, where all the positively charged protons are ...


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Please explain using plain english (without any rules or tables) why is that in asymmetric stretching like the following, there is no change in the size, shape or orientation of the electron cloud that surrounds the molecule? There is a change. The size and shape of the electron cloud does change for the individual bonds affected by the asymmetric stretch. ...


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The answer to this question is simple: Since sigma bonds are the first bond that is formed b/w 2 atoms, its formed by head-on overlapping of orbital, this kind of overlapping gives us a strong bond as compared to sideways overlapping(which happens in case of pi bonds). Also, If you observe the two ways orbitals arrange themselves in the two bonds.....in ...


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