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It depends if the substance in bulk is transparent, highly reflective (metallic) or highly absorptive. Carbon in its graphite allotrope is highly absorptive, and even finely divided is still black. Carbon as diamond is transparent. Crushed diamonds are white -- look at a diamond file or abrasive disk. What happens is that incident light is scattered as it ...


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Both complexes (and many more such as permanganate, sulphate, …) share the same general MO scheme which I am going to shamelessly copy from my older answer: Figure 1: Qualitative MO scheme of a tetrahedric complex with σ and π bonding between metal and ligands. Double vertical lines represent electron pairs. The intense colour of permanganate ...


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You have to memorize the colours for insoluble compound. For soluble compounds, after dissolution, ions form aquated complex with water. In complexes, if CFSE value of a complex is zero, then it will be colourless(except a few compounds,where colour arises due to ligand to metal charge transfer LMCT). (For transition elements) If the ion forms d0 or d10 ...


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There is no simple way to predict beforehand as far as I know. This is a general knowledge type of chemistry question, you will have to know or memorize the colors of common anions and cations. It will be much easier, if you do so group wise and know the colors of the first row of transition element ions. Any object which absorbs a certain portion of ...


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Minor differences in color are likely either due to impurities or due to intrinsic crystal defects such as f-centers. For example, $\ce{ZnO}$ is often a shade of yellow, rather than pure white, due to those defects. In alkali halides, h-centers are similar defects giving rise to colors. You can easily create color centers in $\ce{NaCl}$ with a spark coil in ...


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