1
$\begingroup$

Get a metal like sodium and then you burn it to make sodium oxide because burning something is adding oxygen. Then you add the sodium oxide to an acid like hydrochloric acid. That should make a salt (sodium chloride) and water. Evaporate or filter the water away and you are just left with the salt itself.

Is this possible to do or am I just completely wrong?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Why do you even think it could be wrong? $\endgroup$ – Mithoron May 16 '16 at 19:43
  • $\begingroup$ You can't filter anything out of a solution. Other than that, it's a feasible plan. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 3 '16 at 22:12
1
$\begingroup$

Your description is almost correct - note that when sodium metal burns in air, it forms primarily sodium peroxide in addition to sodium oxide. Sodium peroxide will react with hydrochloric acid to give sodium chloride and hydrogen peroxide. Heating will decompose that to water plus oxygen. You should still be able to get the sodium chloride product that you expected.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

You are correct. Metal oxides will react with acids to form water and the corresponding salt. It's the same with metal hydroxides, they also react with an acid to form water and the salt.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.