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If one searches and navigates to a wiki page for, say, dichlorodifluoromethane one sees the 2D skeletal structure of the compound as below

dichloro(difluoro)methane

This representation appears to be of a particular style that is not exactly what is rendered when one uses a rendering tool such as MolView or obtains data from PubChem and uses other converters/rendering tools.

dichloro(difluoro)methane

The big difference may be that the former example shows bond angle information, stereospecificity and generally emphasizes the geometry of the molecule.

My question is whether there a database allowing access to data which are already in this style (e.g. bond angles and bond types included), or does one typically configure the finer details of the drawing / modifies the source data in order to achieve the specific style alluded to above?

Also, what is the most used name for the style of the former example (2D version which conveys 3D information)?

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    $\begingroup$ Most commonly known (I think) it is as Wedge-Dash Notation. Related in a way: How to wedge d/hash notation a molecule?, and Hash and Wedge nomenclature. I am not sure whether there are databases, but I think Chemdraw can construct these from a SMILES/InChI string, which in turn you could get from a database. Note that the representations usually use fixed angles and bond lengths, which do not necessarily have a 1:1 correspondence to the actual structure. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Jul 27 '18 at 14:04
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    $\begingroup$ Apparently ChemSpider provides: CHFClBr. Please note that the Wedge-dash notation is not recommended for centres in molecules, which are not stereo-specific, i.e. for your example CF2Cl2. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Jul 27 '18 at 14:10
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    $\begingroup$ I have not tried it, but the answer of Geoff might help: Free API to view 2D representation of Molecules || If you found something that works for you, I would appreciate that you share it. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Jul 31 '18 at 10:28

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