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At the supermarket they sold tea for hard water. (Hard water is water with limestone/calcium carbonate in it).

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There appears to be a chemical modification for foods using this type of water.

My question is: What is chemically different about tea for hard water?

Edit: here is the list of ingredients: tea (only)

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Edit 2: - it appears hard water is more basic so a tea mix that is more acidic is required (perhaps)

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    $\begingroup$ A quick Google search seems to implicate that hard water tea is made by using a different blend. "Hard water is the opposite. Tea flavour is dissolved slowly and inefficiently. Therefore, in the most general terms, a hard water tea needs to be better than a soft water tea." "A hard water blend needs lots of quality Assams and East African teas, with plenty of “guts” and strength." allabouttea.co.uk/tea-news/hard-water-tea $\endgroup$ – Bdrs Apr 2 '18 at 15:30
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    $\begingroup$ @Bdrs can you brew this into an answer? $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Apr 3 '18 at 13:17
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Hard water tea

By definition hard water is defined as water that has more than 0,6mg/l of dissolved CaCO3. Therefore soft water that doesn't have that much minerals has a greater dissolubility and can dissolve more tea. It can also dissolve the tea quicker. So the tea companies need to find what tea blend dissolves quickly and efficiently in hard water.

A hard water blend needs lots of quality Assams and East African teas, with plenty of “guts” and strength. It needs flavour too, of course, but this flavour will be the rich, malty type that punches through the hard water. -https://allabouttea.co.uk/tea-news/hard-water-tea/ (as Bdrs commented)

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks this is helpful. Is there a chemistry dimension in your answer I’ve missed? $\endgroup$ – hawkeye Apr 3 '18 at 21:46
  • $\begingroup$ Well, its all about solubility so there isn't much to it. Some say that theres something about acidity (so the pH is constantly 7?) $\endgroup$ – Adinex Apr 4 '18 at 16:54

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