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Ok, so now I have a new question, what type of electrode should I use. I am intending to use a simple stripped wire as my electrode, but am concerned whether the average copper wire would react and create unwanted byproducts. Is it ok if I use copper, or is some other metal better suited to this experiment.

EDIT:

I believe more baking soda would result in more gases because more free floating ions means more conductivity, which would probably allow more redox reactions to occur, and thus allow more gases to be produced.

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    $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome to Chemistry.SE. As this is a homework type of question, you should read through this post on asking good HW questions so that you can get a good answer. For your question, what you really need to do is discuss your thoughts on what would happen and why. Best of luck! $\endgroup$ – airhuff Apr 29 '17 at 5:19
  • $\begingroup$ @airhuff yup, just made the change $\endgroup$ – Jainil Shah Apr 29 '17 at 5:25
  • $\begingroup$ Yea, you got it. The more current that flows (up to the limits of your system) the more product you will get. $\endgroup$ – airhuff Apr 29 '17 at 5:35
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Definitely do not used stripped copper wire, unless you fancy a nice blue solution and electrodes that need constant replacement. You see, copper oxidizes quite readily, so you will end up with lots of $\ce{CuO}$, and a loss in the yield of $\ce{H2}$ and $\ce{O2}$. The best things would be noble metals like platinum, but stainless steel should do fine for your purposes/likely budget.

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