0
$\begingroup$

My colleague and I are working with fertilizers, and we are trying to continuously measure the concentration of urea in water (In situ concentration as function of time). There are two condition that we're considering, first is using distilled water, and second is with the present of some salt (i.e., KCl (0.1 mM-10mM)). Our expected concentration is within 0.1-100 mM


Is it possible to use pH meter, conductometer, or something similar? How would that even work?


Have there been anyone who've done this before?

New contributor
Hafiz Aji Aziz is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
$\endgroup$
5
  • $\begingroup$ A method can be easy, cheap or usable. Choose 2 of 3. // BTW, what concentration? $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Jun 23 at 6:51
  • $\begingroup$ Also, what is the water quality(solute composition) and are there additional additivies? The more relevant details you provide, the more suitable answers you may get, as the optimal method choice may depend on it, if there is ever any simple/cheap enough applicable. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Jun 23 at 7:31
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ See Is there any method to determine urea (in water) and phosphate (KH2PO4 in water) fertilizers by UV-VIS spectrophotometer or titration method? mentioning enzyme biosensor method and spectrophotometic method. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Jun 23 at 9:32
  • $\begingroup$ The presence of salt would interfere with conductivity measurements. A spectroscopic or colorimetric measurement as in the link provided by Poutnik is your best bet. $\endgroup$
    – Buck Thorn
    Jun 24 at 8:11
  • $\begingroup$ Please provide more details. What do you mean by continuous? $\endgroup$
    – Buck Thorn
    Jun 24 at 8:12

0

Your Answer

Hafiz Aji Aziz is a new contributor. Be nice, and check out our Code of Conduct.

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.