9
$\begingroup$

In laboratory setting, is there a difference between glycerin and glycerol?

There are some conflicting info on this topic.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ From what I have heard, glycerine is almost the same thing as glycerol. $\endgroup$ – user14702 Mar 1 '15 at 4:41
10
$\begingroup$

Nope, there is no chemical difference between glycerol, glycerin or glycerine. All 3 names refer to the same compound, propane-1,2,3-triol.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

glycerols are the triol compound used for many purposes in pure or mixed form , but glycerine is the commercial name of glycerol, which is not pure ,which contain mostly 95% of glycerol , it can't be used when pure glycerol is required .

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Glycerin and glycerol are both names for the same molecule. However, depending on where you are getting the glycerol from, it could be more or less pure.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

As far as I know, glycerin and glycerol both refer to the same compound: propantriol.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.