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In laboratory setting, is there a difference between glycerin and glycerol?

There are some conflicting info on this topic.

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  • $\begingroup$ From what I have heard, glycerine is almost the same thing as glycerol. $\endgroup$ – user14702 Mar 1 '15 at 4:41
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Nope, there is no chemical difference between glycerol, glycerin or glycerine. All 3 names refer to the same compound, propane-1,2,3-triol.

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glycerols are the triol compound used for many purposes in pure or mixed form , but glycerine is the commercial name of glycerol, which is not pure ,which contain mostly 95% of glycerol , it can't be used when pure glycerol is required .

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Glycerin and glycerol are both names for the same molecule. However, depending on where you are getting the glycerol from, it could be more or less pure.

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As far as I know, glycerin and glycerol both refer to the same compound: propantriol.

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protected by Community Jun 1 '15 at 18:45

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