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Here is the Link for Ferrofluids for basic idea. After going through this Wiki link, probably many people will come to a conclusion like when Ferrofluid boils, its carrier liquid vaporises and nano particles gets settle down. Therefore Ferrofluid looses its properties(destroyed). I come to this conclusion but not 100% sure. There may be some wild science going over because "nano" particles and its size. So I decided to ask here and get some help from some bright minds across the world.

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    $\begingroup$ No ! A ferrofluid is made of tiny magnetic particles dispersed in a liquid. If you try to heat it up, the liquid will boil first. The magnetic particles will melt then boil at a temperature impossible to reach in an ordinary lab. $\endgroup$ – Maurice Apr 21 '20 at 14:46
  • $\begingroup$ Also, even the liquid portion alone would likely decompose below its B.P. $\endgroup$ – DrMoishe Pippik Apr 21 '20 at 22:24
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Part of the ferrofluid could theoretically be vaporized. As ferrofluid is made from tiny magnetic particles(eg. iron powder coated with a surfactant to inhibit clumping) suspended in a fluid. The fluid can be organic solvents, water and most commonly ink. Some of these fluids can evaporate and recondense. However, as a whole ferrofluid, cannot be vaporized. You can imagine ferrofluid as a cup of mixed sand and water that wouldn't settle(suspended).

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