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I want to ask that if there any substance that has the different number of electrons and protons at its neutral state

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    $\begingroup$ Something neutral must be uncharged. $\endgroup$ – a-cyclohexane-molecule Aug 29 '18 at 15:16
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It's certainly possible, you just need other charged particles that aren't electrons or protons.

For example, a positron is positively charged, so something that's made out of an electron plus a positron would work. See e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onium, or this answer on SE, for a few examples.

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    $\begingroup$ It is worth noting that such substances will not last long. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Aug 29 '18 at 15:13
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Well your question itself is sort of wrong because you assume that individual atoms would have a definite number of electrons... which is usually not the case. In a molecule, electrons can be spread around several nuclei depending on several factors like the atoms' electronegativity or the molecule structure.

In fact, it is not really a matter of how many electrons are around a nucleus but more "how likely" they will be around that nucleus compared to other surrounding nuclei.

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  • $\begingroup$ I want to know if there a way in which the different number of electrons can neutralize the charge different number of protons. Suppose there is a neutral atom with 4 electrons and 3 protons. $\endgroup$ – Nick Aug 29 '18 at 16:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Nick Charge is a fundamental quantity. In normal matter all the charges come from either protons or electrons. The net charge is what you get when you add up all the positive charges from protons and all the negative charges from electrons. So there is no way that 3 electrons can balance the charges from 4 protons. $\endgroup$ – matt_black Aug 30 '18 at 13:48
  • $\begingroup$ @Nick — No, there cannot be a neutral atom with 4 electrons and 3 protons $\endgroup$ – SteffX Aug 31 '18 at 15:16

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