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I know it seems to be a weird question. But for long I have been thinking whether there is any relation between thermodynamic reversible process and reversible reaction. Do they have any connection and if so how?

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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps you might first consider whether a reaction is or is not a process. Once you understand that a reaction is a "chemical" process, you will have your answer. $\endgroup$ – Jeffrey Weimer Sep 30 '14 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ Chemical process? Can you please explain me? $\endgroup$ – user5764 Sep 30 '14 at 15:14
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In thermodynamics, a reversible process -- or reversible cycle if the process is cyclic -- is a process that can be "reversed" by means of infinitesimal changes in some property of the system without entropy production (i.e. dissipation of energy).[1] Due to these infinitesimal changes, **the system is in thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the entire process.**

Thermodynamic equilibrium is an axiomatic concept of classical thermodynamics. It is an internal state of a single thermodynamic system, or a relation between several thermodynamic systems connected by permeable walls. In thermodynamic equilibrium there are no net macroscopic flows of matter or of energy, either within a system or between systems

dO YOU OBSERVE SUCH KIND OF equilibriums IN A REACTION. SO THEY ARE NOT RELATED AT ALL

ACCORDING TO WIKIPEDIA

A reversible reaction is a chemical reaction that results in an equilibrium mixture of reactants and products. For a reaction involving two reactants and two products this can be expressed symbolically as aA + bB ---> cC + dD A and B can react to form C and D or, in the reverse reaction, C and D can react to form A and B. This is distinct from reversible process in thermodynamics.

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