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My book says:

In a solution consisting camphor and nitrogen gas, camphor (solid) is solute whereas nitrogen gas is solvent.

Doesn't this contradict the statements that:
(1) Generally the component present in large proportion is the solvent. I mean camphor will be in larger proportion as it is a solid. We can diffuse much nitrogen gas.
(2) Solvent determines the physical state in which solution exists. If nitrogen is solvent, then how can the solution be in gaseous state? Or if the statement is true, does that mean that the solution exists in gaseous state with camphor particles of collidial size?

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    $\begingroup$ Nitrogen gas can get dissolved in a condensed phase such as camphor, but not dissolve it. Unless we speak o e.g. supercritical CO2, which is not really a gas. $\endgroup$ – Karl Oct 13 '18 at 16:10
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Regarding part 1

Camphor will readily sublime and so, in proportion to the nitrogen gas, it is the minor constituent

For part 2,

If nitrogen is solvent, then how can the solution be in gaseous state?

if the nitrogen is the solvent then of course it will be in the gaseous state as nitrogen is a gas.

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