ed kinsella
  • Member for 7 years, 2 months
  • Last seen more than 6 years ago
  • Surrey England
Do all salts taste salty?
11 votes

The short answer is no, as suggested in the various comments. Not being a biologist I cannot give any underlying theory to explain this, but from personal and reported tasting I can give some examples:...

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How to find the balanced reaction equation for the decomposition of potassium dichromate in non aqueous conditions?
5 votes

I think that part of your difficulty lies in incorrect naming of the products which are simply potassium chromate(VI) and chromium(III) oxide together with oxygen. The equation then becomes: $$\ce {...

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Potassium permanganate (VII) + glucose + sodium hydroxide =?
Accepted answer
4 votes

This is a redox reaction in which the permanganate ion is reduced and the glucose is oxidised. Potassium permanganate is usually used in acid solution and under these conditions is a very powerful ...

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How can I interpret the colour of flames in terms of spectral series?
4 votes

The Balmer series relates to the electronic transitions in the hydrogen spectrum. In other elements it only requires that the energy difference between different excited states corresponds to a ...

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Is purple paint more susceptible to UV damage than other colors?
4 votes

I would also agree with you and the comment from ssavec. The only point that I would make is that it shouldn't be because of the colour of the pigment only the stability of the particular dye it ...

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Why does delocalization of π electrons bring stability?
3 votes

In simple terms electrons repel each other, so distributing them over a geater number of bonds will reduce the repulsive force between them so resulting in a lower energy state. In the case of phenol ...

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A chemical compound with these conditions?
2 votes

I will satisfy 4 of the five conditions, but you will have to research the fifth. Lead(II) iodide has a layered structure, is slightly soluble in water, is ionic (but only weakly). I hope that this ...

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Why the salts in a salt bridge?
2 votes

This is an interesting question with two possible answers that I can see. If you are talking in terms of a galvanic cell used as a source of electrical energy, the current supplied by the cell has to ...

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Is there a difference in the reactions of a dilute acid and a concentrated acid?
1 votes

It depends to some extent on the acid. The most important example would be sulphuric acid because in concentrated form ~98% there is not enough water present to accept the protons available so it ...

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Form the oxides of the element Z=39
1 votes

I am not sure that I understand your question, but in terms of establishing the valency in this case the key point is that in d block elements the energy level of the outer s electrons are very ...

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How can I derive the preferred oxidation states of a transition metal from its electronic configuration?
1 votes

Firstly you need to appreciate that the 4s orbital is at higher energy than the 3d orbitals (despite the filling order suggesting the oposite). This means that the two 4s electrons are lost first ...

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What is the balanced ionic redox reaction of nitrite ions with manganate(VII) ions in acidic solution?
1 votes

Your suggestion is certainly part of the picture, but as is usually the case with nitric acids, a number of side reactions can and often do take place depending on concentration and temperature. In ...

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What is the oxidation number of the oxygen in BaO2
1 votes

Oxidation numbers are an extremely useful form of chemical accounting, but should not be considered as having any actual reality. For instance fractional oxidation numbers are perfectly possible, but ...

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Balancing and combining the half equations in redox
0 votes

I sympathise with your problem using electron half equations when one of the reactants produces two different products. For this reason and the fact that (as the previous answer points out) there are ...

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faraday laws of electrolysis
0 votes

I am not sure what your answer was (2.8 or 5.6dm3) and therfore am not sure what the mistake is. I suggest an alternative application of Faraday's law which strikes me as simpler. The law states that ...

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