Kjetil Sonerud
  • Member for 9 years, 5 months
  • Last seen more than 6 years ago
  • Trondheim, Norway
standard reference for thermodynamic properties?
12 votes

A reference that I've used quite a lot (as a student) is SI Chemical Data, which I guess is quite common. It should contain the data you ask for, among other things. If you are looking for an online ...

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Where can I find Equilibrium Constants?
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5 votes

First, a question: what kinds of reactions are we talking about? Is it a more specialized (in this context) field like biochemistry, or more general chemical reactions? In practice, finding data for ...

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Does a first order reaction really get completed only at infinity?
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4 votes

As far as I can see, the expression you have come up with is not entirely correct. If we assume that the reaction is $\ce{A -> B}$ (i.e. saying that it is approximately irreversible, or that $k_\...

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Do I understand why heat capacity is called 'heat *capacity*'?
4 votes

Expanding on Nicolau Saker Neto's comments above, the heat capacity dictates the (reversible) heat flux required to increase the system's temperature by one unit. Definitions of the heat capacity ($...

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Dependence of change in entropy on temperature
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4 votes

An analogy that I like is one paraphrased from Peter Atkins' great book "The Laws of Thermodynamics - a VSI": Imagine two rather different places in terms of noise - a silent library and a busy ...

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Minimizing Gibbs free energy with Helmholtz free energy expressions
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3 votes

In short, I agree with Curt F.'s answer above. In general, you need a suitable equation of state (EoS) to handle this calculation. From the differential form of the fundamental equation of ...

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Mechanisms in kinetic reactions
3 votes

As far as I know, the short answer is no; in general, it is not possible to know the reaction mechanism a priori. In general, the approach is: Postulate a reaction mechanism/pathway Use this to ...

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Why can temperature changes have units of either degrees Celsius or kelvin?
3 votes

Elaborating Ron’s answer through a concrete example, we start by looking at the Celsius scale $$ T_\text{C1} = 25\ \mathrm{^\circ C} ,~ T_\text{C2} = 100\ \mathrm{^\circ C}$$ Thus, we obtain $$ \...

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How to calculate entropy change for a gas reaction using $S^\circ$?
3 votes

Just to make sure that I get your question correctly; the process in question is a chemical reaction that takes place at a temperature and pressure close enough to the reference temperature and ...

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How do we know the size of atoms in body centered cubic system?
1 votes

The easiest answer in my opinion; try it! If each atom has the same radius, it is simply not possible to fit one of them into the center of the cubic system (known as a cubic hole). It is, however, ...

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