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18

Many volatile liquids are not combustible Dichloromethane (DCM) is a widely used solvent by chemists. It boils at around 40°C (the same as diethyl ether) but is not remotely combustible or flammable. Ether is both very volatile and very flammable, so much so that most labs would prefer not to have it used anywhere where flames or sparks could be present. ...


11

Volatility ( even if by thermal decomposition ) is the necessary, but not sufficient condition for liquids to be combusted, forming a flame. Liquid helium is the most volatile liquid ever, but there is no way to burn it ( chemically ). As other answers mention, there is correlation, as flammable liquids are generally less polar and more volatile than polar ...


7

Not always true. Tetrachloroethylene ("perc", as it is sometimes called in the dry cleaning business) is not inflammable, but quite volatile. Carbon tetrachloride, which was also a common solvent some decades ago, is yet another halocarbon solvent that is volatile, but not inflammable (hence its former use in fire extinguishers). In general, volatility and ...


2

The changed taste that stays after cooling the heated water Hot (boiling) water has a much lower capacity for dissolving gases. When boiling water, $\ce{CO2}$ is removed and through the equilibria behind ($\ce{CO2 + H2O <=> H2CO3}$ and $\ce{H2CO3 <=> H+ + HCO3-}$) so is $\ce{HCO3-}$. Basically, this removes $\ce{CO2}$, overall carbonic acid ...


1

The temperature of water is implicitly covered by actual and saturated vapour content, or equivalent vapour pressures. There is deterministic relation between relative humidity, air temperature and temperature of water, supposed to be in dynamic equilibrium. In such a state, the cooling effect of water evaporation is balanced by the thermal transfer from ...


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