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Your questions can be divided into the following two parts: Since "$\ce {s}$" orbital is uniformly distributed throughout the space in a spherical form, how come your teacher told you that in the $\ce{sp^2}$ hybridization, it is due to the "$\ce {s}$" character in the hybrid orbitals that they can arrange themselves so that the molecule ...


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In $\ce{NH3}$ and $\ce{NF3}$, $\ce{F}$ having higher electronegativity than $\ce{H}$, $\ce{NF3}$ has a smaller bond angle compared to $\ce{NH3}$. Both of these compounds have a lone pair on the central atom. So the bound electrons and the lone pair (if you are using the simple "electrons pair up" model) compete for space. Applying the same logic, ...


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Welcome to Stack exchange chemistry. Consider for a moment what is known as the isolobal concept, there are a series of atoms and groups which all present the same types of orbitals (or at least close to identical orbitals) and the number of electrons. Consider for a moment a methane molecule, if we were to break a C-H bond then the carbon atom would only ...


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