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Assume that the initial temperature is room temperature and neglect the initial amount of acetonitrile in the gas phase. Calculate the equilibrium vapor pressure of acetonitrile at 140 C and compare it with the partial pressure you would calculate from the ideal gas law if all the acetonitrile had evaporated (so that its volume is 100 cc). If the latter is ...


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You notion (1) is just wrong. With notion (2) You have the right idea. You'd need to make some assumptions to solve the problem. So state your assumption and solve the problem from there. I had a wonderful high school teacher who was a stickler for answers to include any assumptions. At the time it was painful, but in retrospect it was wonderful ...


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First, not all gases can be liquefied at room temperature by increasing pressure. If the gas is above the critical temperature, it cannot be liquefied by any increase in pressure; it becomes a supercritical fluid. Supercritical fluids have some of the properties of a gas (e.g. diffusing through fine openings), ans some of liquids (e.g. dissolving solids and ...


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As one increases the pressure, the volume occupied by the gas decreases. Like you said, the temperature should increase with increasing pressure. Equivalently you could say that the thermal energy of the molecules of the gas has increased which manifests itself in increased collisions and vibrations of the constituent molecules. The decrement in volume ...


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Generally speaking, liquid boils at the temperature, at which its saturated vapour pressure is equal the external pressure. With external pressure going down, boiling temperature goes down as well. When external pressure goes down too much, the boiling point may meat the freezing point of the liquid and the liquid freezes. There is no boiling any more, but ...


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"Sealed in a vacuum" is an oxymoron, a contradiction in terms, much like "frozen with fire". If you seal a liquid in a flask containing nothing else but vacuum, then a part of the liquid will quickly evaporate and fill the flask with vapor, so it would no longer be a vacuum. The said vapor will exert some pressure, depending on the temperature and the ...


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As already noted by Maurice, yes you did liquify a gas under pressure. In fact, the scope of application is so wide that this is equally known as Linde cycle. It is highly possible that you have such an engine at home, either as fridge, or freezer to cool stuff, or as heat pump to warm a home. Regarding propane: equally yes. After banning Freon and other ...


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For any substance to melt, it has to overcome or reduces the interaction forces that keeps the particles together in solid state. As the pressure of substance increases, particles tends to remains compacted, increasing of pressure during melting hindering in melting process, makes it difficult to overcome the strong force of attraction, i.e. more thermal ...


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