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The paradox of vapour molecules seemingly needing to have a high kinetic energy to escape from the liquid but not having a high energy in the vapour is resolved if you think about the situation applying to many molecules in both phases. Yes, to get out of the liquid, individual molecules have to pass a threshold of kinetic energy. So the vapour molecules ...


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[OP] It does so because it gained kinetic energy x, and x was great enough to counteract the pressure of the air surrounding it. A gas particle does not "feel" the pressure of the gas unless it collides with another gas molecule or collides with molecules making up the container. The reason the molecule has to have high energy is that it needs to ...


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The vapour pressure under the circumstances of fixed T and n (amount of substance) depends on an additional constraint: either the volume of the container (if rigid) or the value of an applied external pressure. In a rigid container (controlled fixed volume), as the volume is increased more of the liquid vaporizes but the vapor pressure remains constant ...


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According to Raoult's Law, vapor pressure of a component in a solution is directly proportional to its mole fraction. In your case mole fraction is equal to 1(since benzene is the only component), which means that both produce the same vapor pressure.


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Note that the phase rule is qualitative. It says nothing about the particular amounts. It simply enumerates the theoretical number of independent parameters needed to determine amounts and compositions for the given number of components and phases. The definition of a system, like total amounts of components, does not count among degrees of freedom. The ...


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