21

Do not do it !! ( putting acidic, or rather any juice to copper bottles ) You are in danger of copper poisoning. Generally, by food processing laws, copper is not allowed to be in direct contact with food, as there is danger of copper contamination. Especially acidic liquids, like vinegar or citrus juices, directly slowly dissolve copper in presence of ...


21

Under biological conditions it is almost impossible to release HCN Free cyanide can be released from potassium ferrocyanide by heating or by strongly acidic conditions (and some heat). Neither of these conditions is possible in a living organism. The reason why this is so is because the cyanide ligands are very strongly bound to the iron (in slightly more ...


11

How do we tell or suspect one compound to be carcinogenic? As written in the comments to the question, this the result of large studies on the human population, correlating blood or urine levels of some substance to instances of cancer. Alternatively or concurrently, studies on animal models, such as mice, rats or even in-vitro studies may be carried out. ...


8

This is in reply to the following comment. but if Ayurveda recommends it.... – Poutnik The following abstract is from Journal Health Popul Nutr. 2012 Mar; 30(1): 17–21."Storing Drinking-water in Copper pots Kills Contaminating Diarrhoeagenic Bacteria" by V.B. Preethi Sudha, Sheeba Ganesan,G.P. Pazhani, T. Ramamurthy, G.B. Nair and Padma ...


5

There are two parts of your question. We should not mix historical medical practices with modern scientific truths. Also, this does not mean that all old medical knowledge is bad or useless. In older medicine, gold foil arsenic compounds, silver foil, crushed pearls and mercury oxides were added in medicines,. It does not mean that if these practices were ...


4

This table indicates that polyethylene (HD/LD not specified) "melts at" 135°C, decomposes in the range 335-450°C, and produces vapors that will ignite between 341-357°C. I'm sure melting/softening temperature is more complex than that, but I'm not sure that you should expect much decomposition into toxic gases at temperatures below 260°C. However, if you'...


2

Sulfur-containing molecules are indeed used in chelation therapy: prime examples are dimercaprol and penicillamine, both of which contain thiol functional groups.


2

For this process, sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) has been considered as a best reducing agent in traditional and industrial dying but the reducing agent releases sodium sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate ions into the media. Those ions not only cause environmental concerns as major pollutants of the modern textile industry waste waters but they present also no ...


1

No. Heating usual water would be extraordinarily expensive. In all water treatment plant, all over the world, bacteria are destroyed by adding chlorine gaz Cl2 or similar substances delivering Cl2 when dissolved in water. The bacteria are killed by chlorine. So the customer drinks water containing dead bacteria. It does not hurt.


1

Because like so much more, in small doses it's fine. Unlike the previous answer though, I think you may be on to something when you say I understand that the dosage here, if any, might not be lethal; am more concerned about trace amounts causing inefficiencies in bodily functions. I think the only concern being about the conversion to cyanide is a ...


1

Run everything one more cycle and you are totally safe. Copper is highly soluble in water, so it will entirely dissolve and go away, not contaminating your plates.


1

No, there is no way to determine toxicity to humans with a "magical method". Most of our knowledge about toxicity is extrapolated from animal testings and from reported accidental exposures in human. Also, Nazis carried out a large number of human testing on Jews, and this is not limited to toxicity.


1

I wouldn't be too worried about any chemicals that came from either of the products, or from reactions between the products. Any of those would have been volatile enough that they're long gone by now. From your description, it sounds like you may be having a reaction to either residual mold or another allergen present in the trailer. Mold is very difficult ...


1

Polyurethane is a polymer that's made up of toxic chemicals that react pretty completely with each other during the manufacturing process. While there's always potential that there could be residual unreacted materials, I'd say the risk of exposure to these is very minimal. More important would be to look out for formaldehyde. It's a component in some of ...


1

Until perhaps the 1980s printed newspapers used lead type which was set in sheets -- some lead would get onto the paper this way while the ink itself while perhaps toxic did not contain lead. However, the colored comics in the USA used lead in the ink itself. I think lead has been eliminated from newspapers since that time in the USA; I don't know about ...


1

I think you're OK if they're just lying around. Some drives, maybe only older ones, do contain nasty stuff such as beryllium, so I'd be wary of opening them up or crushing them in any way. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/beryllium/healtheffects.html https://www.seagate.com/au/en/global-citizenship/product-stewardship/


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