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Let's suppose we want to titrate a solution containing an unknown monoprotic and weak acid. We use a strong base, such as $\ce{NaOH}$. When the number (and moles) of hydroxide ions is equal to the amount of hydronium ions, here we have the equivalence point. The equivalence point is, when the molar amount of the spent hydroxide is equal the molar amount ...


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From the comments: [OP] Okay Thank you all I finally got it. so K is just thrown out the window. and we are left with the equation (F- + H2O <-> FH + OH-) So i take the Ka to make Kb by (Kw/Ka) and my concentration of F- and OH- was (0.02/0.3) which I plugged into sqrt((Kb)*(M of OH- or F-)) took the -log of that got the pOH and then converted it back ...


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The suitability of indicators is given not only by their range, but also by the direction of the transition. Generally, the transition is always much better from the light colour to the more intense colour, as the equivalence point and it's approaching is much easier to track. So for MO (red 3.1- yellow 4.4), it is toward acidic, for PHPH (8.2 clear -10.0 ...


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