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2

I agree with the interpretation given by andselisk. The authors wish to differentiate thin films vs. bulk of the same polymeric material. One of meanings of bulk given in the unabridged Oxford English Dictionary [by subscription] is Magnitude in three dimensions; volume. 1825 J. R. McCulloch Princ. Polit. Econ. ii. ii. 141 They [gold and silver] ...


3

I think the meaning of the word "bulk" — as it is used in English language — is preserved here despite chemical context. I suspect that it's been used to stress some aspects or features of the surface chemistry: thin film is a 2D object, whereas bulk polymer is a 3D object (e.g. continuous in three directions) possessing a significant volume. From IUPAC's ...


0

The magnitude of heat capacity depends on the pressure and volume, especially in the cases of properties of gases. The temperature of a gm -mole of gas raised by one degree at constant volume. Again in another operation same raise of temperature allowing the volume to very. The quantity of heat in the two operations would be different. Hence, in mentioning ...


1

The distance between two peaks is characterized not by $\Delta m$ but rather by mass resolution. The distance between the peaks is often referred to as $\Delta m$ and assumes that the $z = 1$, but this is not always the case. IUPAC addresses this in detail: Resolution, DOI: 10.1351/goldbook.R05318 (10 per cent valley definition): Let two peaks of equal ...


6

I wanted to back up my comment and make sure it's justified, so I decided to flip through Gross'Mass spectrometry: a textbook [1] and it looks like there are indeed basically two possible variations, including distance between $m/z$ values, as you suggested: {Distance | difference | mass difference} between {peaks | signals | peak tips} {Difference in $m/z$ ...


0

Hmm, I haven't heard about such a term. After a quick search in the IUPAC suggested terminilogy I haven't found anything either. Perhaps there simply is no name for this quantity. I guess you can simply call it separation of the peaks.


1

In gaseous/plasmatic phase, there is no difference - $\mathrm{p}$ and $\ce{H+}$ are synonyms for a proton. The former ( p, proton ) is more often used by physicists in subatomic particle context, the latter by chemists in hydrogen properties/behaviour context. In polar solvents like water or liquid ammonia, "naked" protons nor electrons cannot exist, but ...


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