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5

Some bases taste bitter, some do not. Between bitterness and basicity is correlation, not causation. The strongest bases like hydroxides of alkali metals and alkali earth metals, or alkali metal carbonates, are not bitter. Near all if not all bitter bases are organic compounds with basic groups containing nitrogen, like aminogroups or heterocyclic nitrogen. ...


4

From the abstract of the article by Abu et al. [1]: Here we conclusively demonstrate that humans are, nevertheless, able to distinguish $\ce{D2O}$ from $\ce{H2O}$ by taste. Indeed, highly purified heavy water has a distinctly sweeter taste than same-purity normal water and adds to perceived sweetness of sweeteners. In contrast, mice do not prefer $\ce{D2O}...


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Many compounds are added to dangerous substances that might be accidentally or deliberately ingested There isn't just one, universal, answer to this question. The problem is that there are a variety of different hazards and specific countermeasures may be required for each. And ingestion of some dangerous materials occurs deliberately not just accidentally ...


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It is denatonium benzoate. This comes from wikipedia page of denatonium: Denatonium, usually available as denatonium benzoate (under trade names such as Denatrol, BITTERANT-b, BITTER+PLUS, Bitrex or Aversion) and as denatonium saccharide (BITTERANT-s), is the most bitter chemical compound known, with bitterness thresholds of 0.05 ppm for the benzoate and 0....


1

The taste of halogenated organic compounds mainly depends on the halogen atoms involved. Study showed that halogenation of aliphatic series imparted sweetness and halogenation of aromatic compounds increased/decreased the intensity of sweetness/bitteness. This increase/decrease of intensity is due to the efficacy of halogen atoms which is directly related to ...


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