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67

No. There are sweet, bitter, and various other salts. (Likely, there are tasteless salts too). Pure salty taste is as far as I know exclusive for table salt, though I wouldn't bet on it. Lead and Beryllium salts are said to be sweet, though toxic. Epsom salt, $\ce{MgSO4}$, is bitter. $\ce{CuSO4}$ has an incomprehensible, persistent metallic taste. (Based on ...


40

According to H.C. Urey and G. Failla, Science 15 Mar 1935, Vol. 81, Issue 2098, pp. 273, there's no difference in the taste of ordinary and heavy water.


36

Saltiness is perceived when alkali metal enter taste buds. From wikipedia: Saltiness is a taste produced primarily by the presence of sodium ions. Other ions of the alkali metals group also taste salty, but the further from sodium the less salty the sensation is. The size of lithium and potassium ions most closely resemble those of sodium and ...


34

OK, first of all I want to say I really dislike the videos that this guy puts out, since he is promoting unsafe handling of chemicals. He might know what he's doing, but it's a terrible example. To the actual question: surprisingly there are nearly no sources on this. I can understand that this isn't something a lot of people would try nowadays, but I ...


32

What you are calling "taste" is actually produced by the olfactory sense – "smell." True taste, which requires contact of a substance with your tongue, is limited to sensations of sweetness, sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami. The chemistry of taste is certainly quite interesting, but anything beyond those "flavors" is produced by smell (via ...


17

Why do juice taste awful? Awful taste is due to sodium laureth sulfate, also known as sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), or sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)- depending on which toothpaste you use. SLES and SLS are surfactants(wetting agent). Both chemicals are added in toothpaste to create foam and make the paste easier to spread around your mouth. Both ...


16

permeakra is quite right with his counterexamples of salts that don't taste purely salty, but I'd like to expand on why. We haven't fully identified and elucidated the receptors involved in taste, but they can be broadly classed into tastes people are familiar with: salty, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami. Salty and sour receptors are both known to be mostly ...


12

When a compound is synthesised or isolated, it needs to be characterised. This characterisation serves to determine whether something has been synthesised/isolated before and as a template for later generations to compare their synthesised/isolated compounds to the one you have. Nowadays, one reports NMR and mass spectrometry data; for chiral compounds ...


11

The short answer is no, as suggested in the various comments. Not being a biologist I cannot give any underlying theory to explain this, but from personal and reported tasting I can give some examples: Copper sulphate, iron(II) sulphate, aluminium sulphate among others are very bitter. One you could try yourself would be sodium carbonate (washing soda) or ...


11

The food that you eat regularly is something that you are used to. You know exactly which smell combines with which taste ... but that does not imply that the chemicals you smell are the same that you taste. If you had been eating your whole life long fragrant soap with apple smell, you would wonder about the taste of real apples as you wonder right now ...


10

It's not exactly true that there are 5 "tastes". There are 5 generally accepted classes of gustatory transducers, each comprising many different types. The perception of taste is a product of not only the output of these transducers, but also information from the olfactory system, visual cues, textures, sound, etc. The gustatory system itself is based (like ...


9

The reason behind the bitterness of most fruits is due to presence of Tannin in them. Tannin is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in plants, seeds, bark, wood, leaves and fruit skins. Tannin tastes bitter,dry and astringent and you can feel it specifically on the middle of your tongue and the front part of your mouth. Besides the peels of fruit, we ...


8

From the press release from Suntory, the Japanese company which sent 6 vials of their whisky into space, which details their study: Tokyo, Japan, 30 July -- Suntory Global Innovation Center is about to embark upon space experiments on the “development of mellowness in alcoholic beverage through the use of a microgravity environment.” This research will be ...


8

HDPE has a molecular weight more than several hundreds of thousands, "leaking" is plainly impossible. This taste is the tase of stale water, nobody knows what that taste is actually. Maybe its just the taste of not cold enough water, lacking some dissolved air, or some bacteriae develop after contact with air and light. (google for pseudomonas) The ...


7

The only reactions that I would expect to occur to any significant extent with pure water are acid-base reactions between the citrate and water, where water, being amphiprotic, could act as either an acid or a base: $$\ce{C6H6O7^2- + H2O <=> C6H7O7- + OH-}$$ $$\ce{C6H6O7^2- + H2O <=> C6H5O7^3- + H3O+}$$ Citrate, being the conjugate base of a ...


6

Take a look at tagatose. It is a 6-carbon sugar (a ketohexose like fructose) but is inefficiently metabolized and has about 30% the caloric content of sucrose. It is on the FDA GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list. Unlike common artificial sweeteners, you can cook with it like sugar. It has been industrially produced as a sugar alternative, but it is not ...


6

According to The State Historical Society of Missouri: Sweetwater is the name of a little trading-point established on Sweetwater Branch just after the Civil War. It was named for the branch. and Sweetwater Branch was named by the pioneers for the unusually good water in the stream. The place (and branch) are both in Newton County, Missouri. The same ...


5

Ionic forms of some organic compounds that you will perfectly know, which can also be considered salts, have sweet taste, like sodium saccharin or sodium cyclamate, which are used as "artificial" sweeteners. The latter is considered to be about 50 times sweeter than sugar itself.


5

As mentioned, while not all salts taste salty, many do, and not just salts with sodium ions. If you want to try another edible salt, try to get ahold of ammonium chloride, which is used (both as a powder and otherwise) in sweets in the Nordic countries, the Netherlands and Germany. Its taste can definitely be described as salty, but not the same kind of ...


5

The salt receptors are sodium ionic channels, i.e. peptides which are selectively permeable for Na ions [1]. Ionic current causes receptor activation and neural responce. Anion plays minor role here, imposing upon salty taste. The result may appear acidic, bitter and even sweet. For example, I believe that sulphates are overally bitter. Carbonates or alkali ...


5

after some searching and a little help from google I have found that Potassium (K) Bromide (Br). In a low concentration of an aqueous solution it will taste sweet. In higher concentrations it will bitter and even salty. wiki The toxicity of Bromide isn't very high and it can be tolerated by a healthy human body under some doses. Yet it's long half-life in ...


5

As asked by the OP, I think the answer to the question has to be no. If it was known that a drink contained only glucose as a sweetener, then it would presumably be possible to measure accurately the glucose concentration in the drink. But maybe other substances in the drink would be interferences in the measurement. Following on, as @Alchimista commented, ...


5

Some bases taste bitter, some do not. Between bitterness and basicity is correlation, not causation. The strongest bases like hydroxides of alkali metals and alkali earth metals, or alkali metal carbonates, are not bitter. Near all if not all bitter bases are organic compounds with basic groups containing nitrogen, like aminogroups or heterocyclic nitrogen. ...


4

TL;DR: Don't taste pure elements. They either taste of nothing, taste foul, or kill you. Or all of the above. Edit: Also, for clarification, elements don't have a taste. Taste is a biological reaction to chemical interactions happening with an element, not a property of the element itself. So, like everything else in chemistry, the taste is decided by the ...


4

Water issues tend to be very specific to a certain location, so it is not possible to say exactly for sure what is happening in your situation. Pure water has no taste. The taste comes from the impurities. Impurities, which are almost always present, can partially be removed by the filter shown. That filter looks like a carbon filter which is effective ...


4

From the abstract of the article by Abu et al. [1]: Here we conclusively demonstrate that humans are, nevertheless, able to distinguish $\ce{D2O}$ from $\ce{H2O}$ by taste. Indeed, highly purified heavy water has a distinctly sweeter taste than same-purity normal water and adds to perceived sweetness of sweeteners. In contrast, mice do not prefer $\ce{D2O}...


4

I would say that sodium saccharin is sweet, given its main use is as a sweetener. The sodium salt is used as a more water soluble form of saccharin itself.


4

There are plenty of sweet things that are not sugar(s) People have a sweet tooth (or, to put it another way humans like sweet things). This is an evolutionary adaptation because fresh fruits are both good food (both nutritionally and in providing lots of energy) and rare in pre-modern food gathering cultures. So we are adapted to like things that are sweet ...


3

The ethanol (alcohol content) of the wine, is oxidised, by the oxygen in the air into ethanoic acid. Vinegar is dilute acetic acid which is where it gets its smell. The reaction happens in to stages, The ethanol is partially oxidised to ethanal The ethanal is further oxidised to ethanoic acid


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