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Contrary to Andselisk's opinion, mercury nitrate Hg(NO3)2 is not decomposed into HgO in water. Mercury nitrate is hydrolyzed into a basic salt, whose formula is Hg(OH)NO3, and the equation is : Hg(NO3)2 + H2O --> HNO3 + Hg(OH)NO3 To get pure mercury from mercuric nitrate, Andselisk recommends heating their substance to 400°C. This technique will ...


4

The process you described would be more appropriately called "reduction of mercury(II) to elemental mercury". Unfortunately, the trick with iron likely won't work (something more inert like copper would be a better choice though). Mercury(II) oxide is weakly basic, so mercury salts in general would easily undergo hydrolysis and form basic oxosalts in ...


1

The reference is correct, from [1, p. 888]: Potassium formate: $\ce{HCOOK},$ colorless, deliquescent, rhombic crystals; $M_\mathrm{r}~84.12,$ density $1.91$, m.p. $\pu{167.5 °C}.$ P. is formed by neutralization of aqueous formic acid with potassium hydroxide or potassium carbonate. It is an industrial intermediate in the formate-potash process (see ...


3

Procedure from the paper by Xie et al. [1] (Powder XRD didn't reveal any other impurity phases in the bulk samples): Synthesis of $\ce{CH3NH3PbI3}$. The as-prepared $\ce{CH3NH3I}$ and $\ce{PbI2}$ (Sigma-Aldrich, 5N) were mixed in stoichiometric ratio and dissolved in γ-butyrolactone (Sigma-Aldrich), and then a 40wt% solution was formed. The solvent of as-...


0

So the correct answer (according to my teacher) is that R-COBr is generated from the reaction of POBr3 with R-COOH (benzoic acid)


-1

You don't get a precipitate if you add coppper(II) sulfate to hot salicylic acid. It becomes a clear dark green liquid. I assume the low pH because of the addition of the sulfate ion causes the formation of an acidic complex. I added some bicarb and the copper salicylate formed a light green powder. I added enough till it stopped effervescing as I don't have ...


0

Well actually @Waylander and @Nilay Ghosh are both correct in a way. To convert carboxylic acids into acyl chloride, PCl5 is often used as a chlorinating agent , which yields an acyl chloride and POCl3 (and HCl) as a by product. This POCl3 or POBr3 is essentially a dehydrating agent and is thus used to dehydrate or chlorinate(in some cases) alcohols. But ...


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