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1

I realize this question is old but the mechanism is nicely described here (steps 1-3): http://www.umich.edu/~chemh215/W06HTML/SSG2/ssg6/main_files/Page346.htm Briefly, the released t-butyl carbocation is subsequently deprotonated by the anionic TFA, resulting in the formation of 2-methyl-propene. This regenerates the protonated TFA that is needed to continue ...


3

(Check again if your lab has not a Schlenk line or if one may be purchased, manufactured (your local glass blower), acquired (ebay-like second hand), or shared with your befriended group across the aisle. Because it is a tool equally used in inorganic chemistry, catalysis, etc. Then read a guide like this one to have some general idea, and get an ...


2

I assume you are looking for activated manganese dioxide (AMD). Apart from the Attenburrow process mentioned in @Buttonwood's answer ($\ce{MnSO4 + KMnO4 + NaOH}$), I found three other process that might suit your need (I noticed OP has loads of $\ce{MnSO4}$. So, the aforementioned process will work. The processes mentioned in this answer doesn't involve $\ce{...


3

Your question suggests you did not access Leo Paquette's Encyclopedia of Organic Reagents (14 volumes, some schools have access to the electronic version eEROS), or its one-volume siblings by topic, e.g., Oxidizing and Reducing Agents (this one by Burke and Dannheiser). These resources cover physical / chemical properties of frequently used reagents and ...


3

As noted by @ansdelisk, $\ce{CeCl4}$ hasn't been isolated yet as a pure compound. It exist in a solution although not for too long as it as hydrolyze/decomposes to $\ce{Ce(III)}$ and chlorine. As noted here: Ceric chloride, $\ce{CeCl4}$, has not been isolated. It can be obtained in solution, but the solution cannot be kept without decomposing. Ceric ...


6

To the best of my knowledge, there are no known $\ce{LnCl4}$ species. Although $\ce{CeCl4}$ has been mentioned in older literature, more recent publications tend to refute its existence attributing the observed reactions to $\ce{CeCl3}$ and $\ce{[CeCl6]^2-}$ species, which could be fairly easily isolated and characterized. Among cerium(IV) tetrahalides, only ...


4

Since primary amino acids like glycine, alanine can't be decarboxylated under oxidative conditions, what would be the best catalyst for this reaction? Decarboxylation of $\alpha$-amino acids is known enzymatic procedure in biological systems. Non-enzymatic decarboxylation of $\alpha$-amino acids is also a long-known reaction, which leads to amines with a ...


3

One paper1 suggested use of pyridoxal as catalyst: When α-amino acid are heated with pyridoxal in dilute aqueous solution in the absence of metal ions, two closely but independent reaction takes place: $$ \begin{align} \ce{RR'CNH2COOH ->[Pyridoxal] RR'CHNH2 + CO2} & \tag{R1}\\ \ce{RR'CNH2COOH ->[Pyridoxal] RR'C=O + CO2 + Pyridoxamine} & \tag{...


5

If the only potassium salt you have is $\ce{KCl}$, then perhaps the only feasible way to get rid of the chlorine is electrolysis. Using a cation-selective membrane, electrolysis in water will produce $\ce{KOH}$ (and hydrogen, $\ce{H2}$) at the anode, and chlorine, $\ce{Cl2}$, at the cathode (along with potassium hypochlorite, $\ce(KClO)$). Though this will ...


3

I think you are in correct track in preparing Polylactide (PLA)-starch bioplastic, in a short. The question is actually an opinion-based but interesting one. So, even though there is high possibility that I may get down-voted, I'd like to give few of my opinions. I think you may have to tryout few steps. I agree with the crushing PLA pellets into powder ...


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