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No I don't think both will be the same.They will be enantiomers or non superimposable mirror images of each other.I am sharing a simple trick to find the isomers of a compound with 3 chiral centres instead- RRR and its enantiomer SSS SRR and its enantiomer RSS SSR and its enantiomer RRS SRS and its enantiomer RSR With makes a total of 8! You can ...


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There is no evidence (e.g. aromaticity) to support your claim that the compound is planar. In fact, crystalographic studies [1] revealed existence of both cis- and trans-3,6-dimethylpiperazine-2,5-dione. Corresponding CCDC numbers are LCDMPP01 and TRDMPP01, respectively — feel free to open the links and play around with the 3D structures in JSmol to ...


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The melting point of 1,2,4,5-benzenetetrol is 210C (https://www.chemicalbook.com/ProductChemicalPropertiesCB41307665_EN.htm), so there is very probably significant intermolecular attraction between molecules, probably in three dimensions, which would involve the hydrogens pointing up and/or down, and not in-plane. For a crystal structure, https://pubchem....


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Whoa, there! It's unusual to find such imprecise statements in this forum. The necessary and sufficient condition for a molecule to be chiral is that it has no improper rotation in its point group. For example, the point group of 1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene is $S_4$ so it is achiral. To see why this is the case, any improper rotation can be ...


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if you draw trans-1,2-dibromocyclobutane and its mirror image, you will find that the object and its mirror image are superimposable, and thus though the molecule has two chiral carbon atoms it is superimposable on its mirror image or it has an alternating axis of symmetry which makes the whole molecule achiral!


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