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The Rules Actually the rules for determining the relative stabilities (more accurately, contributions) of resonance structures do have their own priorities. Here is one version of them, with descending order of importance listed below (as is indicated by the bold words). The rules can be found in common organic chemistry textbooks (like [1], also supported ...


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There is experimental data for the methoxy derivative: https://webbook.nist.gov/cgi/cbook.cgi?ID=C78289131&Units=SI&Mask=8 I think that means the (Z) form is favored. I would think the situation is similar in the absence of the methoxy group.


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Alternatively, cast your own sheet (or straight your close-to-final piece) using a mold from a chemical resistant 2 part epoxy. Usually, difunctional or polyfunctional amine hardeners confer chemical/temperature resistance, causing a polymerization in a 3D cross-linked network (it also means saying goodbye to thermoplasticity). Google search - customize it ...


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No. It does not. In order to understand this, you need to have this basic knowledge of the kinetics of multistep reactions In chemical kinetics, there are two ways to deal with multiple-step mechanisms Rate determining step method- Here one specific step is the slowest. So we consider all steps after this step to be equally fast. The rate-determining ...


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I think in both (III) and (IV), Cross Conjugation is present which generally prevents resonance from taking place. In (III), Both CH3O and CH2minus can give electrons to the C in middle. In (IV), After resonance, CHminus(on left) and CH2minus(on right), can give electrons to the C in middle. Supposedly, in (III), O will not prefer to give it's LP ...


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