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1

I think the only real option for this is a clear plastic sheet that's had a chemical resistant thin film applied to the faces. One commercially available example is Makrolon AR2, it's polycarbonate with some proprietary coating that's listed as having >24hrs resistance to acetone and a few other chemicals.


2

Aluminium iodide ($\ce{AlI3}$) is first introduced in 1984 as an easily accessible, a highly regioselective versatile ether-cleaving reagent with novel cleavage pattern (Ref.1). Application of $\ce{AlI3}$ in organic synthesis has been reviewed (Ref.2) and it seems like acetonitrile is the best solvent to be used in catechol ether demethylation (e.g., 2-...


2

According to Palstics International's Chemical Resistance Chart, the A-rated plastics (no solvent attack) towards acetone are: ECTFE (Halar®): transparent films available Fluorosint® PTFE: white HDPE: transparent films available Nylon®, Type 6/6: white PP: clear sheets available PPS: opaque white PTFE: white Among these, polypropylene appears to be the ...


1

Plastics Design Library series include tabulated parameters for the variety of polymers. One of such parameters is a PDL number rating from 0 to 9: 0: solvent dissolved disintegrated 1: decomposition 2: severe distortion; oxidizer and plasticizer deteriorated … 9: highest resistance, no change In the table below I assembled data on thermoplastics ...


2

Tritan is a co-polyester. It is prone to stress cracking in the presence of a number of common solvents - cyclohexanone and tetrahydrofuran are used as surface bonding agents. Acetone can induce stress cracking, as can IPA. I would suggest overprinting if you want to disguise the logo. As for the aluminium item - take your choice - cyclo, THF, acetone, ...


1

I would suggest acetone for both - it's usually very effective for removing colours or inks of all kinds and I used to use it at work (in a lab - make sure you handle and dispose of it safely) to remove permanent marker.


6

Pencil lead writes on rough surfaces by abrading into tiny particles and getting pushed into surface irregularities. If the surface isn't rough, you would get no visible residue of graphite. A pencil might sometimes even leave a scratch on dense wood that is so smooth that it has almost no blackness from graphite. Wood is hydrophilic and even contains some ...


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