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Stirring during crystallization is positive for the purity of the crystals. The explanation is that with stirring, your liquid phase will be homogeneous. Then, there are some other details. Many times, especially in research labs, the target of crystallizing is to get a crystal for XR. What you need then is a crystal big enough to put it into the ...


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"Strong stirring" is a rather imprecise term. There is such a thing as too much speed. Rule of thumb for APIs, if you're working with a magnetic stirrer in a round bottomed flask in a lab (rather than in some industrial vessel or pilot plant setup) 350 rpm is too fast (and no, I can't quote a reference on that, it's one of those things you get ...


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I think your methodology is a bit wrong. When the frozen brine melts into the water, the water won't be 100% water anymore. So, the specific heat capacity of the water changes, making the change in temperature different. Maybe that's why you have a 25% drop when compared to water. You can follow the steps below only if you have a heat source that generates a ...


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Since the temperature of the solid is now slightly lower than the temperature of the surrounding water, heat will be transferred from the water to the solid until the temperatures are equal It is fine to think that way as a rough draft in rationalizing this process. The only issue is that temperature is a macroscopic quantity, and mechanism tends to be a ...


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