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I want to extend Maurice's comment: The amount of $\ce{CO2}$ dissolved in water is proportional to the outer pressure. At $\pu{20 °C}$, 1 liter water dissolves about $\pu{1.7 g}$ $\ce{CO2}$ at normal pressure (1 atm). If the pressure is twice as large, the amount of dissolved $\ce{CO2}$ is twice as much, $\pu{3.4 g}$. To talk about solubility of gases in ...


2

There are two regions of bond energy to look at here: 1) the bonds IN a molecule: a carbon-hydrogen bond has about 100 kcal/mol of stabilization. An oxygen-hydrogen bond is a little stronger, about 110 kcal/mol. Stronger means HIGHER in stabilization energy; but we draw diagrams where the stronger bonds are designated by lines that are LOWER on the diagram. ...


1

You can think of the process of solubilization of a solute A as a reaction: $$\ce{A(\text{solid})-> A(\text{soln})}$$ If the reaction results in a net formation of bonds - by which it is meant that the interactions in the product are stronger than in the reagent - then there must be an accompanying release of excess thermal energy to the solvent to ...


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