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This is a simple logical and semantic problem, which is not a problem at all. Your professor is right and wrong- both at the same time. He is creating a classification which does not exist and which is meaningless. Look at the word origin of electrolyte: Etymology from OED: < electro- comb. form + ancient Greek λυτός that may be dissolved, soluble (...


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For the 8th grader, hmmm... Let suppose this funny equilibrium equation: $$\ce{2 S <=> H}$$ Where $\ce{S}$ are ice skaters on a giant skating ground and $\ce{H}$ are "collision heaps" of 2 skaters laying on the ice. Now, what is the frequency of collisions leading to a heap, if there is "skater concentration" $\ce{ [S] }$ ? It should be $k_1 \ce{...


2

Here are four examples of substances dissolving: $$\ce{C6H12O6(s) <=> C6H12O6(aq)}\tag{1}$$ $$\ce{CH3COOH(l)<=> CH3COOH(aq) <=> CH3COO-(aq) + H+(aq)}\tag{2}$$ $$\ce{NaCl(s) <=> Na+(aq) + Cl-(aq)}\tag{3}$$ $$\ce{SO3(g) <=> SO3(aq);\ \ SO3(aq) + H2O(l) <=> HSO4-(aq) + H+(aq)}\tag{4}$$ Because NaCl is an ionic solid, ...


2

If you dissolve silver nitrate $\ce{AgNO_3}$in water, and add some NaOH solution to make it basic, it will destroy your substance, and produce a brown precipitate of silver oxide $\ce{Ag_2O}$ : $$\ce{2 AgNO_3 + 2 NaOH -> Ag_2O + 2 NaNO_3 + H_2O}$$ But instead of using a hydroxide like $\ce{NaOH}$, you may add some ammonia solution $\ce{NH_3}$. In this ...


1

It is a linear function of temperature (upto 60 C) as per this paper: Solubility of d-Glucose in Water and Ethanol/Water Mixtures, . Chem. Eng. Data 2007, 52, 6, 2166-2170


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I have solubility s given in g/mL. I understand this as mass of solute m divided by volume of solvent V. Your confusion is arising from mixing the concept of solubility and concentration. Unfortunately, both are expressed the same way. You have to see the context. Most authors (like good scientists) try to write their experiment explicitly so that others ...


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