9 votes
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Why does phosphorus give a free electron in silicon doping?

First, don't forget that the phosphorus is sitting on a diamond cubic silicon lattice site, which pretty much defines the symmetry of the potential around it - the P cannot change that, but must ...
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6 votes
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Why does Ga improve conductivity of Ge?

This questions has two parts if you look closely: Which of the following elements is important in the semiconductor industry to improve the conductivity of Ge? All of the above will improve the ...
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5 votes
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Why are silicon and germanium used as semiconductors but not other metalloids?

The statement, "metalloids like [a]ntimony and [t]ellurium are not used as semiconductors", is untrue: Tellurium thin-film transistors have been fabricated. Bismuth nanowires have been used as ...
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5 votes

Why is it important to minimize impurities when doping a semiconductor?

Semiconductors are based on impurities. They just call it doping. The addition of group 3 (Boron group) or group 5 (Nitrogen group) impurities create a hole or an extra electrno, respectively. ...
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5 votes
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What is a covalent semiconductor?

No, most semiconductors are ionic. I'm not sure I've seen the term "covalent semiconductor" before. Wikipedia has an article on covalent superconductors. I think the main point would be that many if ...
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5 votes

What is a covalent semiconductor?

Most semiconductors are inorganic solids but some polymers can be semiconducting and that is probably what the term "covalent semiconductor" is referring to. The majority of semiconductor material ...
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5 votes

What is the limiting value of band gap that makes a material semiconductor?

The transition of electron from the valence band to the conduction band is a probabilistic event. Electrons get this excess energy equivalent to the band gap ($\Delta E$) from the thermal energy ($kT$...
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5 votes

Why is the Einstein relation not valid for germanium?

Quantitative explanations seems hard to come by in textbooks. In Andy Grove's (yes, the Intel guy) Physics and Technology of Semiconductor Devices (1967) one finds Experimentally, mobilities have ...
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3 votes
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What does "spin degeneracy" mean in this context?

I'm not a solid-state chemist, but I think the meaning seems reasonably clear from context to me. "Spin degeneracy" here means that each energy level is capable of holding a spin-up electron ...
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3 votes

What is a covalent semiconductor?

A covalent semiconductor is one whose crystal structure contains covalent bonds. A covalent bond is one in which electrons are equally shared between the bonded atoms. Only silicon and germanium are ...
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3 votes

What is a covalent semiconductor?

Pure silicon (Si) and pure germanium (Ge) are examples of covalent semiconductors. To explain, first take a look at the difference between ionic and covalent bonding. In ionic bondig, the electron ...
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3 votes
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Is the photoelectric effect possible for semiconductors?

Given that Jaques Pankove's excellent book on 'Optical Processes in Semiconductors' devotes chapter 13 to 'Photoelectric Emission', you can rest assured that the photoelectric effect is alive and well ...
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3 votes
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Conductivity of Wüstite

after revisiting the problem I realised where I went wrong. The main mistake with not being careful with units and not reading the qurstion and having incorrect values for hole mobility. $$\text{mass}...
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2 votes
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Difference between vapor-phase transport and vapor-phase deposition?

The paper of interest is C.M. Wolfe et al., "Growth and Dislocation Structure of Single-Crystal Ga(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)", Journal of Applied Physics 36(12) 3790 (1965). The key paragraph is: The ...
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2 votes
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Importance of zinc blende and wurzite crystal structures for semiconductors?

As suggested I can try to summarize the basic idea in an answer although I wouldn't say it solves the bounty. I'm also unsure why you even set the bounty for it. For this I'll quote the book that I ...
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2 votes

What are the oxidation states of galium and arsenic in GaAs semiconductor?

In general, gallium can have +1 and +3 oxidation states, though +1 is a very rare condition. In its turn arsenic possible oxidation states are -3, +3 and +5. As it is stated in Wikipedia, gallium ...
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1 vote
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Is the case of the linear chain of atoms one-dimensional?

I don't believe the author is trying to compare 1D and 3D rigorously. A perfectly linear chain of covalently bonded atoms doesn't exist in isolation past 3-4 atoms, to my knowledge. (longer polyynes ...
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1 vote

Silicon–Boron Covalent Bond

Using your diagram, the boron-silicon bond with only the silicon electron has only half of the possible electron content. A "hole" as you said. The hole is not confined to the one $\ce{B-Si}...
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1 vote

Importance of zinc blende and wurzite crystal structures for semiconductors?

Zincblende and wurtzite structures are not the only ones that afford semiconducting materials. This short list of narrow-gap semiconductors involves compounds with a variety of crystal structures. ...
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1 vote

Conductivity of a semiconductor at high temperatures

A number of different things are going on in this scenario. First, the carrier concentration does increase steeply, although for Si at its melt temperature it is still only about 10$^{20}$/$cm^{3}$, ...
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