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Heating surface with an application of $\ce{NH4Cl}$ results in the release of gaseous $\ce{HCl}$ and especially $\ce{NH3}$, which per Wikipedia on ammonia fuming, to quote: Ammonia fuming is a wood finishing process that darkens wood and brings out the grain pattern. It consists of exposing the wood to fumes from a strong aqueous solution of ammonium ...


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Here is my guess as to what is going on: a solution of ammonium chloride is painted onto the surface of the wood leading to ammonium chloride being absorbed into the surface wood fibres. Ammonium chloride decomposes to ammonia + hydrogen chloride above 340C. Heating with the heat gun achieves this temperature (which is why it takes a while in the video). ...


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Essentially, you are trying to determine the conjugate acid of the borate anion. Yes, that approach is likely to fail with boric acid & borate anions. In fact if you want to form the conjugate acid of $\ce{RB(OH)3-}$ by protonation, instead of protonating the boron atom, you should protonate the oxygen atom, because that's the atom that possesses an ...


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Calculation from the FACT thermodynamics package suggests a mixture of about 80 mol% NaOH and 20 mol% NaI (sodium iodide) will melt below 250°C. Source


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Instead of halides, consider hydroxides A eutectic of sodium hand potassium hydroxides melts at 170°C. See: Sergei Devyatkin. "Interaction of Oxides and Molten Alkalis, Products of Reaction and Application", Sustainable Industrial Processing Summit & Exhibition, Volume 7: Ionic Liquids & Energy Production, Edited by Florian Kongoli, Flogen, ...


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Evaporate a bit of your solution until crystals appear. Then you will have a crystal, or several crystals thereof. Some of those crystalline structures may be a mix of sodium acetate and sodium bicarbonate (this latter is what makes baking soda). You might as well suspend a thin thread of cotton into a glass filled with your solution, and let it evaporate. ...


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