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2

First things first: hydrogen gas and oxygen gas do not spontaneously react but need activation. Activation can be provided by a flame, an electric spark or similar. That said, here is the important part. The reaction will not turn into a fireball but even small volumes will explode with pretty loud bangs. It’s not the loudest bang known to chemistry ...


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While this would have been considered normal in the past (I used such a burner when I was a kid), today bunsen burners are considered outdated as heat sources. Of course it will still work fine fine, but our view on risk has changed. Normally one wants to avoid having any source of ignition in the lab, and burners are also difficult to control. That being ...


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Spraying another compound to neutralize styrene (which is difficult) or whatever it was is probably not helpful, as it takes too long to spread and other potentially harmful materials are introduced, as one would need to apply the substance in excess. Having readily installed outlets for water curtains at the plant might be helpful. The quickest emergency ...


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I found this statement in a paper about $\ce{Hg}$ contamination from dental work: The evaporation rate of elemental mercury at room temperature ($\pu{20 ^\circ C}$) is approximately $\pu{50 \mu g\:cm-2h-1}$ (range of $\pu{40-60 \mu g\:cm-2h-1}$). They cited the following work as a source for that number: Gary N. Bigham, Wanyu R. Chan, Manuel ...


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As the comments in the other post say, there is no need to worry. You'll probably get more mercury and in a more dangerous form by eating fish and seafood and even more if you should smoke. To stay on the safe side, open the windows in your house from time to time, as you probably are doing anyway.


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