16

According to Makromol. Chem., Rapid Commun. 1985, 6 (3), 203–208[1], Kwang Sup Lee and Gerhard Wegner, attempting the synthesis and study of $n>100$, $\ce{C_nH_{2n}}$ cyclo-alkanes and linear alkanes, were successfully able to synthesize a linear alkane of $\ce{C384H770}$ and cycloalkanes with 288 carbons ($\ce{C288H576}$) Linear alkanes up to $\ce{...


6

Normally, in practice the amount fraction of DVB in the feed is used as a nominal number for the degree of crosslinking. IUPAC provides a definition in a somewhat unexpected place [1, p. 2352]: Crosslinking: Property of a solid support prepared from polymeric materials with interconnected strands. Often results from the inclusion of multifunctional monomers ...


5

Snyder cites an article by Li [1] as the primary source for UV cutoff values ("Ref 7" below) for various buffers [2, p. 299]: TABLE 7.1 Buffers for Use in HPLC Separation $$\begin{array}{lrcr} \hline \text{Buffer} & \mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a} & \text{Buffer Range}^\textit{a} & \text{UV Cutoff}^\textit{b} \\ \hline \text{Trifluoracetic acid}...


5

There are a few papers on Zinc-Platinum Systems (e.g., Ref.1 and 2, which are also sited in Ref.3), but most of them are in German. However, there were few useful data published by Johnson and Dillon in their Research and Development Report (Ref.4): $$ \bf{The \ structures \ of \ platinum-zinc \ intermetallic \ phases}\\ \begin{array}{l|l r r} \hline \text{...


5

Vibrational spectroscopy and normal modes are based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and the harmonic approximation. The BO approximation yields the adiabatic electronic states and the corresponding adiabatic energy eigenvalues as functions of the nuclear coordinates. The adiabatic energy eigenvalues of the electronic states are also known as potential ...


5

To complete your literature survey, include this publication cited at least 11 times so far: «Dichlorotrifluorophosphorane (PCl2F3): molecular structure by gas-phase electron diffraction and quadratic force field» by French et al. in Inorg. Chem. 1985, 24, 2774–2777, doi 10.1021/ic00212a014. Despite the paywall, ACS's «In lieu of an abstract, this is the ...


5

This feels like cheating, since andselisk did all the hard work already and could have provided you with the answer, but I would think $$\ce{Na48[H_xMo368O1032(H2O)240(SO4)48] · \text{ca.}~1000 H2O}$$ is a good candidate for the largest inorganic hydrate. Note the "circa" 1000 waters. Unfortunately I don't have access to the Angewandte Chemie ...


5

It might be a protein crystal. Proteins are large and the interstitial space is filled to a large extent with water. The volume of a protein crystal occupied by the solvent can be 50% or so. However the fraction of waters observed in crystals (relatively fixed) is often low, on the order of 10%. For instance, from a report on the crystal structure of crambin ...


5

There are two classical sources which are very thorough and authoritative and describe exactly what you want. They are readable by an undergraduate. A trip to the library is needed. No.1 is Kirk Other Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology and the no. 2 is Ulmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. You can find entries like glass, cement, steel and ...


5

It is not common to find the ferrous ferrocyanide because it oxidizes rapidly. As you can see the remaining salts or pigments are pretty stable in air. This one is white. I quote from a very old Analytical Chemistry book by Treadwell, pg. 155, this should address your query. It states: Potassium Ferrocyanide, $\ce{K4[Fe(CN)6]}$, produces in solutions of ...


4

All group 13 elements (can technically) form nitrides from the direct combination of the elements (elemental reaction). Boron: See @Oscar's answer. Also, see references(1,2) Aluminum: There is a paper(3) which discussed about combustion of aluminum in a high-temperature and high pressure (up to 300 MPa) nitrogen atmosphere to form aluminum nitride. Gallium: ...


4

In the case of boron, a reaction with nitrogen does occur under some eye-popping conditions: Combustion of boron powder in nitrogen plasma at 5500 °C yields ultrafine boron nitride used for lubricants and toners.[1] The characteristic molecular thermal energy $kT$ at this temperature is roughly half an electron volt, which is enough to at least partially ...


4

tldr; it's very difficult to determine consistent additive ionic radii For various reasons, I've gone back to look at covalent radii recently (e.g., for estimating bond lengths). In that case, there seem to be fairly useful recent work, e.g. by Pekka Pyykkö: "Additive Covalent Radii for Single-, Double-, and Triple-Bonded Molecules and Tetrahedrally ...


4

One thing that will help you understand how this can happen at a position that otherwise looks hindered is to consider the geometry at that position. Carbon 2 is planar in the enolate anion, and the nucleophilic molecular orbital is more $\mathrm{p}$-like than $\mathrm{sp^3}$-like. The picture below highlights this geometry (note that the orbital shown is a ...


4

The reaction can also be done if catalyst is applied: [...] we developed a unique cross-coupling reaction of alkyl halides with organomagnesium or organozinc reagents catalyzed by using a 1,3-butadiene as the additive. This reaction follows a new catalytic pathway: the Ni or Pd catalyst reacts first with R−MgX to form an anionic complex, which then reacts ...


3

This reaction does not work for Grignards due to competing deprotonation and reduction reactions, however it is possible if you first modify the Grignard with copper to make the cuprate (Gilman reagent). There is a detailed explanation here


3

The NIST Atomic Spectra Database,[1] which is as authoritative as it gets, shows that $\ce{5d^9 6s^1}$ is the correct ground-state electronic configuration for platinum. Various inorganic textbooks also say the same. Wikipedia cites Meissler and Tarr for this table: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_configuration#Other_exceptions_to_Madelung's_rule ...


3

American Society for Metals has many publications. Temperatures below ambient are no problem for any aluminum alloys. They are commonly used for natural gas separation liquefaction exchangers and piping down to −100 °C (guess at the temp.). In the T6 condition (hardened) room temperature yield is 31000 psi; at 300 °F the short term yield is 20000 psi; 6500 ...


3

The polarizability of molecules determines how a molecule interacts with other molecules (intermolecular interactions and chemical reactions), how it interacts with electromagnetic radiation (optical properties), and how it interacts with electrical fields (electrical properties). Thus, there are multiple ways to compare the polarizability of two molecules ...


3

"f-hole is critical to describe DoS of IrO2 correctly." [...] This implies, that f-electrons are somewhat involved into chemistry of Ir. Perhaps naïvely, but I would dispute that the second statement follows from the first. While f-electrons are generally not critical for the chemical reactivity of molecules or materials, their inclusion indeed ...


3

As it has been pointed out, molecular oxygen is paramagnetic. It is exceptional in that. Usually, you require either a transition metal ion, or a lanthanide ion, or a radical, for a molecule to be paramagnetic. For most other molecules, including as far as I can tell the fuels you mention, you can safely assume that they are diamagnetic. Paramagnetism is ...


3

I hadn't heard of a "boat" diagram, but the alcohol-aldehyde-ketone "mast" rang a bell, so I went hunting... Is this the "boat" diagram you're talking about (or similar to it)? https://o.quizlet.com/MGXYzJ7s01UHNZq3TDAVEw_b.png (retrieved from https://quizlet.com/513370563/organic-chemistry-reaction-pathways-diagram/) I can see ...


2

References about Nomenclature Successful communication requires an agreed set of definitions compiled as nomenclature. An example for such compilations are IUPAC's Color Books, named by the color of their book cover. Below, they are listed in alphabetic order of their color. Favre, H. A. Powell W. H. (eds.) Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC ...


2

Or consider the Merck Index, which lists the properties and practical applications of about $10'000$ chemicals by alphabetic order, covering more than $2000$ pages. Afterwards, there is a list of about $500$ different types of chemical reactions, And it is not expensive (about $100$ €) as it has been printed and reprinted so many times since its first ...


2

One of the most comprehensive descriptive chemistry books is Holleman and Wiberg's Inorganic Chemistry. It fits your encyclopedic criterion with about 2000 pages with all major atomic structure concepts plus descriptive chemistry of the elements. It is being published for more than 100 years and originally it was in German. Another classic, again of about &...


2

You need to define what an "operating temperature" is, for what application. An alloy that will work perfectly fine as a structural material for your kitchen oven will fall apart if used in aerospace applications. Your best bet is to find alloys used in similar applications and argue, by analouge, that these alloys will also work with your ...


2

The permethylation of cyclohexanone with KH/MeI is described here JOC paper. The yield quoted is 96% and other ketones are also exemplified.


2

Third edition (latest offline edition) of the ACS Style Guide (currently known as The ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication) has a section devoted to reporting analytical data, including mass-spectrometry and EIMS in particular [1, p. 275]: Mass Spectrometry MS $m/z$ (relative intensity): $238.2058~(44.8\%),$ $195.1487~(100\%),$ $153.1034 ~(21.2\%).$ GC–MS $...


2

Although Ben Norris has given excellent explanation for why the steric hindrence is not playing the role in the reaction of cyclohexanone with excess methyl iodide to give tetramethylated cyclohexanone, there is an enother reason why reaction proceds so smoothly under given condition to give more than 80% yield of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylcyclohexanone. It is the ...


1

I have a solution which has $[\ce{H2SO4}]$ = 0.915M (I assume $[\ce{H+}]$ = 1,830 M). While $\ce{H2SO4}$ is a strong acid, $\ce{HSO4-}$ is not ($\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a}$ around 2). So your pH should be about zero, and you might not need to use the Hammett acidity at all.


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