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4

Besides the the thermodynamic aspects discussed by Matthew, consider the kinetic aspects. Oxidation by a chlorine oxyanion involves displacenent of oxygen from its bond with the chlorine. Such a displacement, in a protic solvent such as water, must involve protonation of the oxygen: Oxygen without the proton would have to be displaced as oxide ion, which ...


1

It is very analogical scenario as connecting capacitors or electronic DC sources ( with floating potentials ) in a serie. With 2 cells in a serie, the same provided charge spends the doubled amount of electrode material. And vice versa for charging. Even without looking into electrochemistry details, energy conservation law requires doubled voltage for 2 ...


7

First, hypochlorite ($\ce{ClO−}$) is not a strong oxidizing agent compared to other chloride oxyanions, at least in acidic medium. Under standard conditions in acidic medium, chlorous acid ($\ce{HClO2}$) is the best oxidizing agent among them due to the largest positive number for standard electrode potential: $$\begin{align} \ce{HClO2 + 2H+ + 2 e- &<...


0

Voltage and (thermodynamic) electrode potential are slightly different things. Electrode potential refers to the maximum amount of work that can be extracted from a given single cell under very specific conditions and at a given concentration of metal ions. Now forget about the cells shown in chemistry textbooks. First think of a hydraulic analogy. Think of ...


1

Absolutely a good experiment! Diffusion of ions, propelled by the electric field (i.e., current) will occur at a given, calculable rate. Deposition of those ions (and conversion to $\ce{O2 + H2}$) will occur and the $\mathrm{pH}$ will rise at the cathode (negative electrode) and fall at the anode (positive). Then back diffusion will occur as the $\ce{OH-}$ ...


1

You can see my detailed response on the sign of electrode potentials here: Still taught to reverse oxidation half cells in electrochemistry? To summarize, electrochemists all over the world have decided to quote all electrode potentials as reduction potentials. This tug of war of signs between the so-called European convention and American convention of ...


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