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Once $\ce{Ba^2+}$ is eliminated as poorly soluble barium(II) sulfate, there is a solution of soluble copper(II) and zinc(II) sulfates. Considering this has been done by careful/gradual addition of sulfuric acid, and the fact that both remaining sulfates undergo hydrolysis, the solution is going to be slightly acidic — this is one reason for sodium hydroxide "...


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A battery has a small shelf life if it discharges internally. Saying that a discharged battery is in chemical equillibrium (or much closer to it than a fresh one) is a true statement, obviously, but nothing else. If you reverse the polarity of a primary battery, you get some other reaction than the one happening during discharging backwards. That says ...


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You can imagine the cell electrodes as capacitors, that are charged by chemical way. But the capacitance of these capacitors $$C=\frac {\mathrm{d}q}{\mathrm{d}E}$$ is very small, so does the accumulated charge $q$. The charge loses due pushing electrons through the wires of a closed circuit are balanced by simultaneous recharging by ongoing redox ...


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Let's look at how you would add in the water and hydroxide ions for the $\ce{MO4^{3-}->MO(OH)}$ reaction. Step 1: Start with the given metal species, with the metal oxidation states included: $\ce{M^VO4^{3-}->M^{III}O(OH)}$ Step 2: Add the electrons according to the oxidation states. Here the oxidation state on the metal drops by two, so there ...


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