14

For classical analytical problems you have to check at least 100 year old literature. It is easy in Google Scholar. Set the date limits to 1920s or 1950s whatever you wish to try. In older times, the conventional wisdom, which still persists, was that one should use a higher molecular weight standard. The rationale was that the relative error will be small ...


6

As suggested in the comments, the predecessor of the method that uses "Missouri" tablets was developed at the University of Missouri (Columbia, Missouri, USA). I believe the first report was from 1972 and named the method as the "Missouri Automated Nitrogen Method (MANM)". They also refer to it as the "Missouri Technicon" method ...


4

Instead of glassware, you might have to think about metallic containers. A 1 M NaOH solution should not be that harsh for stainless steel for a short period of time. Imagine, in the chlor-alkali industry, nothing is made of glass. The electrodes are made of titanium as far as I remember. If we were rich, a platinum lined crucible would have worked! Titanium ...


4

From the Wikipedia entry on Tollens 1 Tollens' reagent is a chemical reagent used to determine the presence of an aldehyde, aromatic aldehyde and alpha-hydroxy ketone functional groups The substrate you have drawn is an alpha-hydroxy ketone.


4

That is correct, the two numbered reagent and solvent pairs refer to two reactions, that will be done after one another. There is an intermediate product that can be isolated, or at least identified.


3

You were correct up to this point, the strong base alcoholic KOH sets off elimination instead of substitution so you will not get an alcohol. Accordingly your products A (presumably propene) and B are correct. The amide/ammonia is an even stronger base than alcoholic KOH and will also produce elimination. With a vicinal dihalide like your B, there is an ...


3

The base, as you pointed out is nearly always the salt of the acid corresponding to the annhydride. This is because the base which differs in structure will react with the given carbonyl compound and yield some other compound rather that abstracting a proton. Eg. Let's say you have tertbutyl salt there instead of what we are having right now.The tert butyl ...


2

Yes it does, under basic conditions to give two carboxylic acids, according to this paper by Bunton & Shiner J. Chem. Soc., 1960, 1593-1598 here Abstract of the paper: The oxygen atom of the acetone from oxidation of pinacol and 2-methyl- propane-1,Z-diol by periodic acid comes from the l,Z-diol, in agreement with the suggestion that an ...


1

The problem is the soloubility of calcium carbonate is very poor. It is 14 mg/l. So it is not possible to prepare a solution with 1 g/l, but instead you can use sodium carbonate, the soloubility 217 g/l. To get the same molarity you have to dissolve 1,06 g of it.


1

Maxted[1] reported in 1926 that the reaction of tartaric acid with silver produces oxalic acid, formic acid, CO2 and water as products and that the stoichiometry is 6 moles of silver reduced per tartartic acid. He proposed the following possible net reactions: $\ce{C4H6O6 + 6 Ag+ + 2H2O -> 2(C2H2O4) + 6 Ag + 6 H+}$ $\ce{C4H6O6 + 6 Ag+ + 2H2O -> ...


1

Listerine/Total Care/Stain Remover/Anticavity Mouthwash (4 lines to name the product!) contains H2O2 and sodium lauryl sulfate (and 21.6% ethanol) in a purple plastic bottle. Both the ethanol and the sodium lauryl sulfate would lower the surface tension of the solution. You might try this mouthwash on the ceramic as is - it is supposed to clean teeth...


1

You might consider chlorhexidine gluconate. It is a cationic surfactant used as a skin cleanser and disinfectant prior to surgery, and is an ingredient in certain mouthwash products, so it must have low toxicity. Drug stores sell scented and unscented solutions for hand washing -- choose the unscented.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible