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Silicon dioxide is difficult to decompose directly, but it can be broken down in the presence of other reagents at more moderate temperatures. In particular, the reaction of silica with elemental silicon has been known since 1905: In 1890, the German chemist Clemens Winkler (the discoverer of germanium) was the first to attempt to synthesize $\ce{SiO}$ ...


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The hydrogens which you have chosen are correct but both the carbanions are NOT eqaully stablised via the resonance. In case of malonic ester, the elctrophilicity of the carbonyl(c=o) is reduced due to the resonance from the oxygen beside it. So the carbanion will not be pulled very effectively into resonance as the carbonyl becomes electron rich due to the ...


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Yes they can in acidic solutions according to the abstract of this paper$^{[1]}$: O-Alkylhydroxylamines react with nitrous acid with a rate law $v = k_2\ce{[R^1NH2^+OR^2][HNO2]}$; the mechanism involves electrophilic nitrosation at the nitrogen atom of the free base. At acid concentrations below $\pu{2M}$-per-chloric acid, hydroxylamine and N-...


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In my assessment, an advanced reaction involving a cyclic REDOX reaction occurring with Copper ions, which I have previously discussed in this work 'Generation of Hydroxyl Radicals from Dissolved Transition Metals in Surrogate Lung Fluid Solutions' by Edgar Vidrio relating to disease (cancer) likely induced from progressive damage to DNA (in the new ...


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It is always good to cite the link when you mention that you saw a redox reaction online. It is wrong anyway. Aqueous Cu(II) is not an strong enough oxidizing agent that it will convert organic matter into carbon dioxide. In other words, it is a weak oxidizing agent. Ascorbic acid is oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid and Cu(II) should be reduced to Cu(I). ...


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