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Cement is basically made of impure $Ca_2SiO_4$, which is made of independent $Ca^{2+}$ and $SiO_4^{4-}$ ions. When mixed with water, the following reaction happens : $$Ca_2SiO_4 + H_2O \unicode{x2192}Ca(OH)_2 + CaSiO_3$$ The useful part of this final mixture is $CaSiO_3$ which has the structure of a polymer made of a long chain $H-O-(-Si(O^-)_2-O-Si(O^-)...


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If you have a look at the main types of reactions in inorganic chemistry (here I am only speaking of the common ones): Redox reactions- These electron exchange reactions are often so fast, and so spontaneous, with K values of higher powers of 10. It hence becomes very difficult to have a 'mechanism' for them, as an important part of a mechanism is knowing ...


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I suspect that you could be forming an aqueous solution of $\ce{(NH4)2PtCl6}$. I would like to make an observation as a person who has done platinum group metal chemistry, the anionic chloro complexes of PGMs like $\ce{PdCl4^2-}$ and $\ce{PtCl4^2-}$ are very toxic. They can induce a nasty allergy to PGMs. I would suggest that you do not work at home with ...


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I believe a similar question had been asked before. Most inorganic reactions take place in aqueous media in their ionic form, and the substrate is simply not complex enough to warrant a reaction mechanism. As far as I know, mechanisms do exist for Coordination compound reactions. You might want to check out this book which explains inorganic mechanisms ...


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This is a class of carbocation 1,2-rearrangement reactions, and historically named Wagner–Meerwein rearrangement after two chemists who discovered the reaction (see following diagram): Although it can be explained considering as an rearrangement of a classical carbocation, there are a tremendous amount of work has been done considering 2-norbornene cation ...


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Liquid phosphorus is white phosphorus. It melts at 44.1 °C. Red phosphorus does not melt. It burns at 200 °C and sublimes in an argon atmosphere at 280 °C, without melting.


1

It's a single dehydration with a carbocation intermediate that allows the five-membered ring to expand to a more stable six-membered ring.


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I would expect the aldehyde to be the major electrophile in this reaction. The reason is that the steric demands for a nuelophile coming close to the carbonyl carbon are lower than for the same nucelophile coming close to a ketone. I would expect that the enolate formed from the reaction of the methyl phenyl ketone (acetopheone) to be slightly more stable ...


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Well, I understand it, but I don't like it. There's an error in line 5 of eq 5. When you subtract the two equations, put everything in writing: 0.0556x + 0.0377y - 0.0566x -0.0566y = 0.366 - 0.535 Then -0.0189y = -0.169, (not 0.0377y = 0.169) Then y = 8.94g (Fe) (answer) (And incidentally, x + y = 9.62g, so x = 0.68g (Al)) I sympathize with you - ...


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It depends a bit on what you are trying to achieve : If you are trying to form an emulsion, for example a homopolymer emulsion resin solution, then the emulsifier is absolutely necessary. If you are trying to extract a water soluble entity from the oil/powder phase then an emulsifier may actually interfere with the process - at least in terms of post ...


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Yes, generally more resonance structures mean more stability but this case is an exception. In three of the four resonance structures of the benzyl radical, the aromaticity is being broken which makes then less stable whereas in the allyl radical both the canonical forms are stable. Therefore the allyl radical is more stable than the benzyl radical.


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