15

Here's an excerpt from an interview with the author of Fight Club, Chuck Palhniuk. How to make Napalm with Frozen Orange Juice and Gasoline? Well, Ed Norton changed one ingredient in every one to make them useless. So, that really pissed me off because I really research those really well. Actually its styrofoam and gasoline - it make the most ...


12

Most likely, mercury was used as a colorant, specifically red. This list shows mercury providing a red color in flame tests, and the same would presumably be seen in fireworks. Several other, less dangerous elements also give red or reddish colors. This site identifies lithium as providing the color in red fireworks, and also mentions lithium carbonate ...


10

In "Fireworks, the Art, Science, and Technique", Takeo Shimizu gives a very good explanation of color production. For blue, the color-producing firework chemical is thought to be copper monochloride. If there is no free chlorine in the flame, there can be no blue color.The discovery of colors produced by chlorine along with other elements belongs ...


10

The method I've used is a simple propane torch, which you can get at Home Depot for $14 and magnesium powder. The mixture of powdered aluminium, iron oxide, and magnesium is thoroughly mixed and then lit using the propane torch. It lights all the time with the magnesium embers burning brightly and then the main reaction takes hold. Getting powdered magnesium ...


9

"Sparklers" – literally the same pyrotechnic sticks handed to children for celebrations – are what railroad welders use to ignite iron thermite. These are essentially flash powders mixed with a binder to slow their burn rate. One pyrotechnician created electric thermite igniters by binding a 50/50 mix of CuO and 325-mesh graphite with ...


7

According to this Wikipedia article, there has been military research into nano-thermite, which can contain molybdenum, bismuth or tungsten oxides. It would be possible to test for residues of those after the fire. Also, "nano-thermite" sounds awesome!


6

According to the German nursing profession wiki, the contents of human feces are as follows: 75 % water 10 % (non-digestable) remainder of food (e.g. cellulose) 8 % enteric bacteria 7 % epithelium (cells from your own gastrointestinal tract) rest = mucus and salts Given that, initially only the lighter fluid will burn. This will heat up the ...


5

Before discussing symmetrical nature of explosives, we might ask, "Why do they contain so many nitro groups?" The answer is in estimation of energetic properties that relies on the empirically derived Kamlet and Jacobs equations 1 . In these equations the heat released by the decomposition, the number of moles of gas produced, and the molecular ...


5

The main reason to synthesize symmetric molecules are related to their synthesis: Some symmetry is due to the nature of the molecular structure itself, like RDX and HMX. This is related to tricyclic structure of hexamethylenetetramine. Similarly, for Tri/tetramers of peroxyacetone. For these structures, they are created rather spontaneously (HMX with some ...


5

By blowtorch anyway. It is cheap and extremely useful for similar experiments. Personally, I used $\ce{Al}+\ce{S}$ mix as a starter, that was initiated by blowtorch (note, this mix produces aluminium sulphide that stinks with hydrogen sulfide.) - it is easy, cheap and reliable starter. Also, a magnesium ribbon can be ignited by common lighter - I did it ...


4

The original meaning of napalm referred only to the thickener, not the flammable substance which it thickens, and not the mixture of the two. The aluminum soaps of this mixture of acids was christened "napalm" from "nap" for napthenic acids and "palm" for the coconut fatty acids. Quoting from the 1951 article They Don't Like "Hell Bombs"; Napalm + ...


4

My son did thermite reactions for a 3rd. grade science project. We were able to easily initiate the reactions by using commercially-available thermite "fuses" which appear to be regular fuse that is about 2 inches long which then has a small, shiny square of metal about 1/2" x 1/2" and fuse product at the bottom. We just inserted the fuse, shiny metal ...


3

When the interior gunpowder charge explodes, it blows the stars in all directions and ignites them. They then burn very rapidly (perhaps explosively) giving the star effect exactly because the stars are a mixture of fuel and oxidizer. If the stars were all fuel (carbon), they would be essentially charcoal briquettes. In that case the center would explode, ...


2

The best way for you to find out if a chemical is safe for your use case would be to look at the safety data sheets for your chemicals. For your convience, I have linked to relevant ones below. Copper (II) Chloride Calcium Chloride Borax Copper (II) Sulfate Alum Strontium Chloride Potassium Chloride Lithium Chloride Sodium Chloride Magnesium Chloride ...


2

In a very similar video I found, some gentlemen microwave gasoline, the flammable component of napalm, along with aluminium foil. The aluminium sparks when exposed to the microwaves, igniting the gasoline vapors in the microwave. Once all the vapor in the microwave is combusted, the microwave must then once again fill with gasoline vapor. When it once again ...


2

You might want to wrap the magnesium ribbon around a sparkler. The latter can be ignited with an ordinary lighter.


2

They certainly can. Put some water in the bottom of a beaker, fill the beaker with chlorine gas, and drop in bits of calcium carbide. The carbide will produce bubbles of acetylene, which will spontaneously burst into flame when they hit the chlorine. Flame colors depend on many things, even in oxygen. In general, flames in a chlorine atmosphere will ...


1

Fluorine gas definitely supports flaming combustion. And does so more than oxygen. Very dramatic, actually. Chlorine, less so than oxygen or air, but still possible in right setting. See below for examples of fluorine flames. Examples are not in $100~\%\ \ce{F2}$ environment, but should be obvious that $\ce{F2}$ makes more flames than air. In many ...


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