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$\ce{BaSO4}$ is insoluble in dilute solutions of acids, because this dissolution would produce the following ions in solution : $\ce{Ba^{2+}, H^+}$ and $\ce{SO4^{2-}}$. And the preceding reaction has shown that $\ce{Ba^{2+}}$ and $\ce{SO4^{2-}}$ cannot exist simultaneously in solution : they must react to produce a precipitate of $\ce{BaSO4}$. On the other ...


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would it be possible to dissolve silver chloride just by adding another, more insoluble salt? For example: $$\ce{AgCl(s) + NaBr(aq) -> AgBr(s) + NaCl(aq)}$$ It is possible to get the chloride ion back into solution by adding NaBr. The effect is to lower the silver ion concentration so drastically that chloride goes back into solution. This kind of ...


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The easiest way to make precipitation is using washing powder and water and then mixing it with baking powder and water. When they are mixed together the mixture goes from clear to cloudy and becomes hard water.


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All chromates are usually yellow, orange or red. The mercury salts are a good example. the mercury(I) chromate $\ce{Hg2CrO4}$ is brown at room temperature, and turns red at $100$°C. It changes crystallization system at high temperature. the mercury(II) chromate $\ce{HgCrO4}$ is yellow at room temperature, and becomes red at $100$°C. This change is due to ...


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As a brief recap, when calling such reaction a "molecular equation", we are supposed to forget that the empirical formulas for ionic substances refer to formula units, not molecules. We treat all components as if they were molecules. The quirk with "molecular equation" lies within the willful ignorance striving for a simplification in ...


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