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4

Inspired by @Jan's Answer. Following image considers the case when the liquid drop is under rotation (shown by blue curved arrows). Let us consider the frame of reference as one which is rotating with the same angular velocity as that of the droplet. Since we are in a non-inertial frame, we need to consider the pseudo forces - and here it is the centrifugal ...


3

In addition to Poutnik’s answer, it is possible to manipulate a drop of water in space to generate a force similar to gravity within it: by applying gentle airflow to make the drop of water rotate. Water in a rotating drop is subject to centrifugal forces, meaning that there is now an ‘along the force’ and an ‘opposite to the force’ direction which act in a ...


9

In gravityless environment, all directions are equivalent save the very vicinity of the surface(*), where just few water molecules are toward the surface. Therefore, in the bulk volume, the precipitate would stay where it is, unless some currents exist for whatever reason. At the very surface, it depends on nature of precipitate. If it is rather ...


0

$$\ce{XYZCl + AgNO3 -> AgCl + ...}$$ The mass of chlorine in AgCl is equal to the mass of chlorine in the unknown sample. We can calculate the mass of chlorine from the mass of silver chloride: $$m_\ce{AgCl} = \pu{2.350 g}$$ $$m_\ce{Cl} = \frac{M_\ce{Cl}}{M_\ce{AgCl}} \cdot m_\ce{AgCl} = 0.247 \cdot \pu{2.350 g} = 0.581 g $$ To get the mass percent, we ...


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