New answers tagged

1

Use the equation for the vapor pressure of the solid to get the heat of sublimation. The heat capacity of the vapor minus the heat capacity of the liquid is equal to the derivative of the heat of vaporization with respect to temperature. The heat capacity of the vapor minus the heat capacity of the solid is equal to the derivative of the heat of sublimation ...


1

It has already been suggested to use liquid nitrogen to cool oxygen and that is probably your best bet. You could research something called a cryocooler that can be used to condense air or pure oxygen but it is very costly and would not be worth it unless you plan on using a continuous supply liquid oxygen and/or nitrogen. If you're just going to do few ...


3

When you heat up a liquid at constant volume (leaving sufficient space for the gas phase), the density of the liquid will decrease and the intermolecular interactions will weaken. Some of the liquid will transition to vapor, so the vapor above the liquid will get denser and the frequency of intermolecular interactions will increase (it behaves less and less ...


2

After some thought, it is probably worthwhile to actually write an answer rather than a short, fairly useless comment. Lets look at the Cu-Ni phase diagram, as calculated using the CALPHAD parameters given in the paper referenced in many of the pictures below (X.J. Liu et al., J. Electronic Materials 37(2) 210-217 (2008)). Overall: This looks a lot like ...


0

I can't understand why the air (and its pressure) doesn't work like a piston, making sure no water is in gas state at 1 atm It is because water vapor and air mix. If you place a thin foil on the water surface (e.g. saran wrap), the air will work like a piston, pushing on the foil, which pushes on the liquid water and on any molecule that tries to escape. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included